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Wax candles.


prashantakerkar
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Thanks.

CnH2n+2

The Flame colour of the Candle burning - Yellow can be changed depending upon the composition of n carbon atoms in the chemical composition.

I.e Can we have different flame colours other than Yellow ?

If yes, how?

If no, why?

Thanks & Regards,

Prashant S Akerkar

Edited by prashantakerkar
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Thank you.

What will be the different chemical reactions to get different flame  colours in Wax candle manufacturing process?

CnH2n + 2 + ? = ? - To get red flame

CnH2n + 2 + ? = ? - To get green flame

CnH2n + 2 + ? = ? - To get blue flame

and so on ....

My requirement is as soon as the Candle is lit, the flame Colour should be different other than light yellow (default colour).

In fact, there should be Candle products available with different flame colours for the consumer in market.

Thanks & Regards,

Prashant S Akerkar

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1 minute ago, prashantakerkar said:

- To get red flame

 To get green flame

red flame - Strontium salts 

green flame - Copper salts

blue flame - can't remember - look it up.

4 minutes ago, prashantakerkar said:

In fact, there should be Candle products available with different flame colours for the consumer in market.

 

There probably is - google it.

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59 minutes ago, prashantakerkar said:

Can you give me the chemical reactions for the same ?

Not sure what you want - different ions burn with a different colour flame. It's to do with their spectral patterns. I don't think chemical reactions are relevant to what you are on about - type 'flame colours of ions' into google. There is a lot of stuff there.

So - dip the wicks in salt solutions of the metal ion that will give the colour of flame you want.  I have no more for you   -  maybe there is another way of doing it but you'll have to research it yourself.

 

 

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You are going to run into the same problem as with  the camphor flame.

"When performing a flame test, the colour of a flame is affected by external materials added to it. A non-luminous flame is used, to avoid masking the test colour by the flame's own colour"

 

From

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luminous_flame

 

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