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Brett Nortj

Finding mass of elements.

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If you want to find the mass of an element, and you are writing a multiple choice test, as, with the focus of chemistry tests being based on multiple choice with weights and mass of elements, there is a simple 'formula' that anyone with basic grade six maths can learn. If you find you need to find the weight without a multiple choice option, you obviously have the option of opening a text book, yes? So, on with the test scheme!

This follows that every entry of weight is nearly doubled based on the atomic number or number of protons. There is little to choose from on these tests. If it is based on areal quantity, then it will be easily identified with this doubling of atomic number, yes?

The rare exceptions come within range anyway. There might be a fluctuation of one or two here or there, and, on the test, the numbers after the decimal are easily ignored.

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Of the top of my head:

- atomic mass of Uranium: about 238

- atomic number of Uranium: 92

doubling 92 is not within 1 or 2 of 238. Not even close.

I'm going to start reporting you for trolling. Your ignorance in every subject is starting to annoy me.

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1 minute ago, Bender said:

Of the top of my head:

- atomic mass of Uranium: about 238

- atomic number of Uranium: 92

doubling 92 is not within 1 or 2 of 238. Not even close.

I'm going to start reporting you for trolling. Your ignorance in every subject is starting to annoy me.

Hey, nobody is perfect.

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