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Brett Nortj

'Orbital table of elements.'

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This is a formula for finding orbital clusters around each element I worked on about a year ago, but, I could not find anyone on the forum to confer with me the ideas presented by myself.

This follows, after the liquids, when metals begin, it takes on a formula.

If you ever played dungeons and dragons, the magician's spell advancement table will show you the amounts of orbitals per level or proton beyond first, of course. This means there is one s orbital, or 'level one spell' at firs level, then, two s orbitals or level one spells at second level, then, a third new type of orbital with those previous ones at level three or with the third metal. At the fourth metal after on the table, there are three s orbitals and two of the second type.

Really helps to consult these games!

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9 hours ago, Brett Nortj said:

This is a formula for finding orbital clusters around each element I worked on about a year ago, but, I could not find anyone on the forum to confer with me the ideas presented by myself.

This follows, after the liquids, when metals begin, it takes on a formula.

If you ever played dungeons and dragons, the magician's spell advancement table will show you the amounts of orbitals per level or proton beyond first, of course. This means there is one s orbital, or 'level one spell' at firs level, then, two s orbitals or level one spells at second level, then, a third new type of orbital with those previous ones at level three or with the third metal. At the fourth metal after on the table, there are three s orbitals and two of the second type.

Really helps to consult these games!

Which "liquids" are you talking about? There are only two elements liquid at room temperature, and one of them is a metal.

While there is some similarity in the tables, it is more useful to learn the actual logic of the s, p, d and f orbitals.

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4 minutes ago, Bender said:

Which "liquids" are you talking about? There are only two elements liquid at room temperature, and one of them is a metal.

While there is some similarity in the tables, it is more useful to learn the actual logic of the s, p, d and f orbitals.

So you do not see the reason of applying this reference to find the averages of these elements?

I thought the elements come between the gases and the metals? :huh:

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1 minute ago, Brett Nortj said:

So you do not see the reason of applying this reference to find the averages of these elements?

I thought the elements come between the gases and the metals? :huh:

Those are the non-metals and the semi-metals. 

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1 minute ago, Bender said:

Those are the non-metals and the semi-metals. 

Thanks!

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27 minutes ago, Brett Nortj said:

I thought the elements come between the gases and the metals? :huh:

Whether element is metal, or non-metal, or it's in solid, liquid, gas or plasma state, depends on temperature and pressure. Metals are metals just because we're here on the Earth and using room ambient environment temperature.

Increase temperature, with fixed volume, and metal will turn to gas at high enough temperature.

 

Increase temperature, with fixed volume, and Hydrogen will turn to metallic state at high enough temperature.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metallic_hydrogen

 

See for example non-metal Sulfur. It has many allotropes. S2, S3, S4, S5, S8 to name a few.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allotropes_of_sulfur

(some of them are metallic!)

 

Edited by Sensei

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11 hours ago, Brett Nortj said:

If you ever played dungeons and dragons, the magician's spell advancement table will show you the amounts of orbitals per level or proton beyond first,

FFS!

 

2 hours ago, Brett Nortj said:

I thought the elements come between the gases and the metals?

Thanks for clarifying that you have absolutely no idea what you are talking about.

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