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Unleaded Petroleum.


Dennis001
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Hello i was trying to build a fuel saver system for my small engine 5.5hp 4 stroke. Its a fuel vapor system. But without going into to much detail about it, because at this point i think i have something good and dont want to tell many people about it. All i need to know is when my fuel vapor system is in operation it gets super cold and my engine dose not like it. What i am asking is, if i put to much air through Petroleum dose it go in a cold state. Or what happens to it. If i add heat from the exhaust will that bring it back to normal.

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3 hours ago, Dennis001 said:

What i am asking is, if i put to much air through Petroleum dose it go in a cold state.

A sudden reduction in pressure will do this. For example, if your source of air is compressed.

Or it could be evaporation of the petrol. But that would mean you were losing fuel, I think.

3 hours ago, Dennis001 said:

If i add heat from the exhaust will that bring it back to normal.

Plausible. But potentially dangerous if it gets too hot!

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Thanks for your reply. So will unlead petroleum can act like the gas in your a/c system. After it comes out of the small orifice the gas expands and gets cold. So at the moment, i have air and fuel going through the carburetor (dont know the size of the hole that goes through the carburetor) out to my device, witch has a slightly bigger pipe then to the engine. My device has the same in and out diameter pipe. So will this cause the pressure drop. My carburetors hole through the center is about 18mm and my device has 19mm. Hiw much will this effect it.

Thanks

Sorry for lack of info. It would be easier if i could tell you what my idea is, but i need to know why the fuel  and my devise gets so cold.

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If you blow air through petrol then at least some of it will evaporate.

In order to do so, the  molecules  must be separated from the liquid and that takes energy.

In the absence of any other energy source the energy will be taken from the thermal energy of the material- and it will get cold.

After a while, it will be so cold that very little evaporates and so there will not be enough to run the engine.

Providing heat from somewhere- like the exhaust manifold- would help. The problem would be controlling the temperature.

The "lead" in the petrol isn't going to make much difference here.

 

Incidentally, there's a difference between petroleum and  petrol (also known as "petroleum spirit" or gasoline). Petroleum is crude oil and you couldn't really run an internal combustion  engine on it.

 

 

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2 hours ago, John Cuthber said:

The "lead" in the petrol isn't going to make much difference here.

Except make any accidental inhalations even more dangerous!

Can you still get leaded petrol? In backward countries like the US maybe? :)

But, weirdly, apart from the title, leadenness doesn't seem to come into it.

 

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 27/07/2018 at 11:19 AM, Dennis001 said:

Hello i was trying to build a fuel saver system for my small engine 5.5hp 4 stroke. Its a fuel vapor system. But without going into to much detail about it, because at this point i think i have something good and dont want to tell many people about it. All i need to know is when my fuel vapor system is in operation it gets super cold and my engine dose not like it. What i am asking is, if i put to much air through Petroleum dose it go in a cold state. Or what happens to it. If i add heat from the exhaust will that bring it back to normal.

Adding heat from the exhaust would result in used fuels mixing with unused fuels. This will replenish the used fuels, as they cool, and then there will be homeostasis.

Very good idea! This will result in getting more fuel out of the engine, and, reusing old fuel.

To make it even more useful, you could 'condense' the used fuel to create a permanent fuel cell, like a rechargeable battery, yes? Be careful, there might be too much density build up, but I cannot see that going on for a while, but, it will heat up the engine as it purrs along...

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It's definitely evaporation that provides the chill. That's how your freezer works.

It would be safer and more practical to use exhaust heat to warm the air intake than the fuel. I don't know if modern engines do that. It's all fuel injection these days.

I vaguely remember some coolant being directed to a carb in something I was fiddling with years ago. That would be safer than exhaust gases, but it wouldn't work till the engine got warm, and it's no use in an air cooled engine.

Or you could warm the carb electrically.

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