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avicenna

Is mass spectrometry consistent with our chemical balance?

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Has there been any experiment done through chemical analysis to check if mass spectrometry is consistent with our chemical balance?

Our current analytical balance has an accuracy of 10¯⁵. The chemical composition by weight of two isotopes forming a compound could be analyzed. This is sufficient to determine a relative atomic mass of two isotopes and to compare with the CODATA values obtained through mass spectrometry. The values should be the same to at least the third decimal. This is a very good test of the reliability of mass spectrometry.  

We have about 19 monoisotopic elements including Fluorine and Iodine; these two may react with the other monoisotopic elements to form compounds.

 

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1 hour ago, John Cuthber said:

This is only about a redefinition of some SI units such as the kilogram. With whatever changes in the SI units, the atomic mass will still be measured through mass spectrometry.

When mass spectrometry was invented after the 1910, they only go for greater improvements to get higher resolution. There is no published experiment that anyone made any independent verification if mass spectrometry is reliable. Our current analytical balance is accurate to 10¯⁵, enough to make chemical analysis of relative atomic mass of compounds composed of single isotopes of the elements. A simple example is sodium iodide; both elements exist as stable single isotope in nature.        

 

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2 minutes ago, avicenna said:

There is no published experiment that anyone made any independent verification if mass spectrometry is reliable.

 

It would be quite untrue to claim that the only possible way to measure isotopic masses is by direct force balance (the chemical balance) or by mass spectroscopy.

There are other perfectly satisfactory ways.

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31 minutes ago, avicenna said:

This is only about a redefinition of some SI units such as the kilogram.

What do you mean by "only"?
The folk doing this took the trouble (and money)  to produce lots of isotopically enriched silicon precisely because they want to compare the mass spectroscopic result with the "conventional" one.

 

I could use a laugh; exactly what experiment would you like to see?

 

Edited by John Cuthber

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Mass spectrometry could be used to literally separate two isotopes in macroscopic amounts...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calutron

..unfortunately it was used in the most disgusting accident of this world.. to create nuclear weapons used to attack Hiroshima and Nagasaki..

 

Edited by Sensei

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