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black hole+white hole


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Well i found someone that did do the maths:

 

But, let me show you that a negative mass would fall downward:

 

F=-Gm1m2/d2

 

This is Newton's Law of Gravity. G is a constant. The negative sign is there to show that the force (F) is usually downward. m1 and m2 are the two masses in question, usually the mass of the earth and the mass of some object which is attracted to it (actually they are attracted to each other). And d is the distance between the centers of these two objects. We see that in the case of one of these masses being negative, the negative signs cancel, and the force on this object (F) is positive (upward).

 

F=ma

 

This is Newton's Second Law of Motion. It shows the relationship between force (F), mass (m), and acceleration (a). It can be taken to be the definition of mass. We want to restate it as a=F/m, to solve for acceleration. Normally, we have a negative force (downward), and a positive mass, producing a negative acceleration (downward). In the case we are studying (negative mass), we have a positive force (upward), and a negative mass, which produce a negative acceleration (downward). A negative mass falls downward.

http://www.jimloy.com/physics/negative.htm

 

Surely then the negative mass of the white hole would therefore fall into the black hole like the negative mass falling to Earth?

 

But, how would a negative mass behave in the Earth's gravity? Some may be surprised to know that a lump of negative mass, would fall down at the same rate as any positive mass. The influence of gravity is an acceleration, not a force. This was known by Galileo, who demonstrated that objects of different masses accelerate toward the earth at the same rate regardless of their size or weight in his legendary experiment from the Tower of Pisa. Perhaps it is unfortunate that we have come to speak of the "force" of gravity, when we should speak of the "acceleration" of gravity".

http://www.concentric.net/~pvb/negmass.html

 

So if the black hole was Earth, then a small white hole would fall into it would it not?

 

Please correct me if this is total pig swill ...

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If we must use those ridiculous names with any degree of seriousness, then Black-holes and White-holes are nothing but the cosmic scale of charge (as within the microcosm).

Like charges repel while different charge attract.

The effect is on the separation space vectors resultant in contrast with the space in which those phenomena are embodied.

From that perspective, relativity will not be applicable to the interaction, but a cosmic scale quantum mechanical model can do the trick. (Ask Wheeler). :D

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Like charges repel while different charge attract.

 

We're talking about gravety here. Gravety doesn't have a charge, just a quantity. By your theory, since I have mass and the Earth has mass (both positive), then we should repel eachother (and thus I should be floating in space)... doesn't work that way. The positive mass creates an attractive force while the white hole creates a repulsive force. Which every force is bigger, wins. As in if the black hole is bigger, it sucks up the white hole into it's oblivion. And if the white hole is bigger it pushes the black hole away.

 

Since gravity and magnetisum are closesly related, I can see how you might have confused them, but in magnetisum is where like forces repel and opposite forces attract.

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From my understanding, we ARE talking about negative and positive. Perhaps gravity isn't magnetism (and it isn't), but here we are talking about theoretical "White Holes." From the previous discussion, "White Holes" have been described as having negative mass and thus negative gravity (negative gravity meaning antigravity).

 

Gravity pulls things towards an object's center of gravity. Antigravity pushes things away from an object's center of gravity. If the white hole's mass's absolute value is greater than the black hole's mass's absolute value, it would seem that the black hole would push away from the white hole.

 

|-10kg|>|9kg|, black hole loses and is pushed away.

 

|-10kg|=|10kg|, there is a tie and there is no net movement.

 

|-10kg|<|11kg|, black hole wins and pulls in the white hole, creating a smaller black hole.

 

I would presume that e=mc^2 does come into effect, as Danny8522003 suggests.

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I would presume that e=mc^2 does come into effect, as Danny8522003 suggests.

 

e=mc^2 determined the amount of energy given off when an atom's nucleus is destroyed (fission). Destroyed is probably not the best word but...

By measuring the mass of different atomic nuclei and comparing that number with the mass of the individual protons and neutrons, one can obtain an estimate of the binding energy available within an atomic nucleus.

The equation is meant to tell you what happens when mass becomes energy. That doesn't happen in this case, mass is just added to mass...

 

Here's a link to a definition of e=mc^2 given by Wikipedia.

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Mass is just added to mass, yes. But when NEGATIVE is added to positive, there is a loss. Matter disappears. Something must happen to it.

 

Adding a negative is the same as subtracting a positive, you know.

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I couldnt make up my mind and so turned to my trusty friend Google and found

this:

 

This does not correspond to matter anti-matter annihilation. As will be shown in Geometrical Physics B, 4 , anti-matter located in our universe owns a positive mass and positive energy. Their meeting gives photons. The two produced photons carry the total amount of energy of the matter and anti-matter particles, before their collision. If two objects with opposite energies could meet, collide, the result should be totally different. That would give .... nothing.

 

Pretty self explanatory...

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Does a white hole have to be the thing that spits out the matter? Say that a black hole just ends up going somewhere else in space, say it re-opens as a quasar. Maybe if matter gets sucked in under the enormous gravity, it goes faster than the speed of light. Would it be able to fly out the other end fast enough to escape?

 

This question relates to a thought of mine, because I wonder if maybe black holes re open as quasars.

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  • 2 weeks later...
Isnt a quasar just a name for an object that gives off very energetic radio waves?

 

Nothing can go faster than the speed of light without using up infinite energy' date=' which is impossible..[/quote']

 

actually, technically speaking it is energy in regards to i, if you follow the equasion through, which some could argue (in this case anyway) is ABOVE infinity

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