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olivernurse

Nuclear Reactor water cominination

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Hello, i was wondring if anyone knew about what kind of contamination water used to generate steam might have in terms of radiation thanks

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Welcome Oliver;

What in the water do you think could become radioactive?

Edited by studiot

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Secondary Coolant(used to make steam) isn't directly in contact with the fuel.

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7 hours ago, studiot said:

Welcome Oliver;

What in the water do you think could become radioactive?

Hello, im not sure i was just thinking that exposure to it might result in contanination, thank you. 

7 hours ago, Endy0816 said:

Secondary Coolant(used to make steam) isn't directly in contact with the fuel.

Ah ok, thank you thats helpfull. I was thinking about a concept for somthing and that's good to know 

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There are particulates that can flake off of piping and from valves. These can absorb a neutron and become radioactive. Iron isotopes and Cobalt-60 (maybe Nickel, too).

When the reactor is running, O-16 can absorb a neutron and eject a proton, becoming N-16, which is radioactive. This has a half-life of a little over 7 seconds, so this dies away quickly once the reactor is shut down.

20 hours ago, Endy0816 said:

Secondary Coolant(used to make steam) isn't directly in contact with the fuel.

Unless there is a primary to secondary leak. And that assumes a two-loop system.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boiling_water_reactor

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15 minutes ago, swansont said:

There are particulates that can flake off of piping and from valves. These can absorb a neutron and become radioactive. Iron isotopes and Cobalt-60 (maybe Nickel, too).

When the reactor is running, O-16 can absorb a neutron and eject a proton, becoming N-16, which is radioactive. This has a half-life of a little over 7 seconds, so this dies away quickly once the reactor is shut down.

Unless there is a primary to secondary leak. And that assumes a two-loop system.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boiling_water_reactor

 

Thank you for updating my knowledge.

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40 minutes ago, swansont said:

There are particulates that can flake off of piping and from valves. These can absorb a neutron and become radioactive. Iron isotopes and Cobalt-60 (maybe Nickel, too).

When the reactor is running, O-16 can absorb a neutron and eject a proton, becoming N-16, which is radioactive. This has a half-life of a little over 7 seconds, so this dies away quickly once the reactor is shut down.

Unless there is a primary to secondary leak. And that assumes a two-loop system.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boiling_water_reactor

Thought about talking about type differences. Under normal conditions for the most common type, though you're good to go.

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49 minutes ago, swansont said:

When the reactor is running, O-16 can absorb a neutron and eject a proton, becoming N-16, which is radioactive. This has a half-life of a little over 7 seconds, so this dies away quickly once the reactor is shut down.

This reaction, to eject free proton, would require fast neutrons. Slow/thermal neutron can be captured by Hydrogen/Deuterium and Oxygen, without further ejection of free proton. If Deuterium will capture neutron, it'll become radioactive Tritium.

"Tritium is also produced in heavy water-moderated reactors whenever a deuterium nucleus captures a neutron. This reaction has a quite small absorption cross section, making heavy water a good neutron moderator, and relatively little tritium is produced. Even so, cleaning tritium from the moderator may be desirable after several years to reduce the risk of its escaping to the environment. Ontario Power Generation's "Tritium Removal Facility" processes up to 2,500 tonnes (2,500 long tons; 2,800 short tons) of heavy water a year, and it separates out about 2.5 kg (5.5 lb) of tritium, making it available for other uses.[6] Deuterium's absorption cross section for thermal neutrons is about 0.52 millibarns, whereas that of oxygen-16 is about 0.19 millibarns and that of oxygen-17 is about 240 millibarns."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tritium

Half-life of Tritium is 12.32 years .

 

 

Edited by Sensei

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There are an awful lot of gas turbine generators (both fixed and mobile) in this country. I would think they would find a way to operate them to power the cooling systems. 

or truck in more diesel. or keep the reactor running to power its own auxilaries if nothing else.

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