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Does Faster Than Light Mean Faster Than Physics?


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I was wondering about those flash's (The superhero, of course) delayed punches he performs on Injustice, In which He performs a punch combo and the opponent's body reactions (hit animations) only take place a few time after the hit itself, I know very little about superheroes but thinking about it, I realised that most of the opponents reaction would be pretty much physics and inertia, rather than reaction time or character actions, what functions totally different, thus making the move extremelly unrealistic and senseless, although, we know lightspeed is pretty much a limit for physics as we know it (some real reality-breaking stuff happens after that ). So, If his punches were faster than lightspeed, would it mean he won a race against universal laws and landed it before inertia itself take place?

Maybe some DC experts would say it has some scientifically acceptable explaination already on the games series or comics and It could be a silly question , but as I stated before I am rather ignorant on that matter, so forgive any obvious question I made.

Thanks;

Arthur

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Consider some observer traveling from point A to point B. At the same time this observer leaves A, a light beam is sent out towards the destination, B. This light travels in the area of fairly flat space-time outside of any effects that might be caused by the method our observer uses to travel from A to B. If the observer ends up at B in time to see the light beam arrive, then the observer is said to have traveled "faster than light".

http://www.physicsguy.com/ftl/html/FTL_part4.html#sec:ftlnotes

 

edit: I guess I should note why I quoted this piece. The following quote from the same article explains it nicely:

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Notice that with this definition we don't care where the observer is when he or she does the traveling. Also, if some space-time distortion is used to drive the ship, then even if the ship itself doesn't move faster than light within that distortion, the ship still travels faster than the light which is going through the normal, flat space-time that is not effected by the ship's FTL drive. Thus, this ship still fits our definition of FTL travel.

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Perhaps it's obvious, perhaps not but it's imo important to consider that FTL does not necessarily mean moving faster than .. in an ordinary sense.

Edited by tuco
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There was a young lady named Bright
Whose speed was far faster than light;
She set out one day
In a relative way
And returned on the previous night.

Attributed to an unknown entity

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I wish i could had done that, in some event of my life :)

 

Albert Einstein said:

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"The purpose of mechanics is to describe how   bodies change their position in space with   time.” I should load my conscience with grave sins against the sacred spirit of lucidity were I to formulate the aims of mechanics in this way, without serious reflection and detailed explanations. Let us proceed to disclose these sins.

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p.10: In order to have a complete description of the motion, we must specify how the body alters its position with time; i.e. for every point on the trajectory it must be stated at what time the body is situated there.

 

 

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p.43: The rigid rod is thus shorter when in motion than when at rest, and the more quickly it is moving, the shorter is the rod. For the velocity v = c we should have Sqrt(1-v²/c²) , and for still greater velocities the square-root becomes imaginary. From this we conclude that in the theory of relativity the velocity c plays the part of a limiting velocity, which can neither be reached nor exceeded by any real body.

 

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p.67: The four-dimensional mode of consideration of the “world” is natural on the theory of relativity, since according to this theory time is robbed of its independence. This is shown by the fourth equation of the Lorentz transformation: image.png.662c654c0c7fca66ec99440f01b81738.png FOUR–DIMENSIONAL  SPACE Moreover, according to this equation the time difference ∆t' of two events with respect to K' does not in general vanish, even when the time difference ∆t of the same events with reference to K vanishes. Pure “space-distance” of two events with respect to K results in “time-distance” of the same events with respect to K'. But the discovery of Minkowski, which was of importance for the formal development of the theory of relativity, does not lie here. It is to be found rather in the fact of his recognition that the four-dimensional space-time continuum of the theory of relativity, in its most essential formal properties, shows a pronounced relationship to the three- dimensional continuum of Euclidean geometrical space.1 In order to give due prominence to this relationship, however, we must replace the usual time co-ordinate t by an imaginary magnitude ct⋅− 1 proportional to it.

 

Edited by MaximThibodeau
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21 minutes ago, MaximThibodeau said:

To explain that fact we must refer to Aether, but its not Physics, since Einstein law.

It never was physics really. Just an assumption that turned out to be wrong. (An example of when "obvious common sense" is misleading.)

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Flash will cause nuclear fusion reactions in the air in front of his fist before reaching light speed. No physics need to be broken to turn the scene into a nuclear wasteland.

He'll also need pretty strong bones not to shatter his arm with the inertial forces on his fist and pretty strong skin for it not to rip off as it wants to lag behind the bones.  

Edited by Bender
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