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Edward

Magic bullet.

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why not abandon the firearms and use a weapon that will accellerate a projectile without the heat of gunpowder. i was thinking maybe a railgun or even a superhigh burst of pressurized water. a millimeter thick stream of water at 30,000 psi can cut through 3 feet of steel in half a second (maybe an exageration but someone will correct me)

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hey a crossbow.. use ice darts i saw that in some game. cool them in liquid nitrogen and they will melt on contact with the targets body heat ... slowly mind you

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the only problem with Ice in a crossbow is that it`s not "Elastic" enough, and will shatter in flight as even a crossbow bolt flexes in flight, even the short stubby bolts bend a little.

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Also, ice is an incredibly brittle solid. Only very large 'bricks' of the stuff have any sense of stability to it. Anything the size of a bullet will wind up being too brittle to do anything with. The idea of using ice for a bullet is simply a fantasy myth by spy novel/movie writers and has no basis on fact.

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you MAY get away with very fine sawdust soaked, shaped and then frozen. it has the elasticity and strength far beyond that of ordinary ice, and would also leave nothing in the way of riffle striations or fingerprints.

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The thing is, the heat of the priming charge that goes off, and is required to send the bullet on its way, is just far too high to keep the ice solid. The heat generated immediately vaporizes the ice. If you tried the sawdust idea, you may even get the sawdust to combust inside the barrell of the gun which would probably be a very bad thing.

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the sawdust ice mixture would be less likely to vaporize in a gun barrel becuase it melts far slower than normal ice.

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True, it`s also more resiliant than cement for some applications too, as for the heat it does something quite interesting by setting up a protective layer whereby very little more heat can get through :)

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Okay, I'd really like to know the physics behind that one. I'm having trouble grasping how the addition of a substance like sawdust can cause the ice to withstand the heat of the priming charge going off in the gun.

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By using a shotgun and then picking up the wad, there is no ballistic evidence to worry about.

 

By using a saboted bullet as in the excellerator, one would, to be safe, need to locate and retreive the sabot.

 

If one used a conventional pistol or rifle, then disposed of the weapon, there is nothing to match the ballistics to. Here, when I say dispose of, I don't mean to simply throw it away, I mean to melt it down with a cutting torch.

 

Another method is to simple lap the barrel out with a fine valve grinding compound after the shooting, thereby changing the markings left by the tool marks inside the barrel.

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Okay, I'd really like to know the physics behind that one. I'm having trouble grasping how the addition of a substance like sawdust can cause the ice to withstand the heat of the priming charge going off in the gun.

sure, this may help: http://www.geocities.com/Broadway/1928/pykrete.htm

and the obligatory Wikipedia entry: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pykrete

 

Cool stuff eh! (some pun intended).

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I shall test this, hopefully I will have pictures within the next two hours.

Please bear in mind I will not be using full loads, only primers. If this is successful, I'll up the ante a bit.

 

One more edit: I'm even whipping up a block of half hearted ballistic gelatin, hopefully we're not all disappointed. :D

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How about a soluble capsule that would 'melt' on contact with an enzyme in the body and release a lethal dose of a chemical that the body would make in smaller doses naturally, and mock a heart attack for example?

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how would the capsule survive the massive pressures involved being a projectile?

and there`s no need to disguise the method of death, so a poison may just as well be tracable, it`s the delivery that`s Key here :)

 

OMG what am I saying! what the hell is this thread about anyway!????

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thats what i was just thinking, WHAT THE HELL IS THIS THREAD ABOUT ANYWAY!

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Once again, YT has proven himself to truly be "The resourceful one."

BTW, was this attempted on the Myth Busters?

PICTURES HAVE BEEN REMOVED

 

 

FR-8 .308 Winchester

test.JPG

 

Entry

test.JPG

 

Penetration

test.JPG

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what is that, a bar of soap?

 

The ice bullet and meat bullet was attempted on mythbusters, but not the pykrite (sawdust ice) bullet.

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Why were the pictures removed?

1. Pictures of a hole in a block aren't all that exciting.

2. To save bandwidth(mine)

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Pykrete has proven successful in my three low velocity attempts, however the question remains to be answered as to it's effectiveness at higher velocities. Any volunteers to test this? I will be unable to do so until I go to my dacha this weekend.

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