sci-man

new alloy?

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Posted (edited)

hello everybody,

I am sci-man (AKA TheDarkOverlord),

and i was wondering, if you make an alloy out of titanium and carbon steel how strong would it be and how high of temperatures ( Fo) do you think it could stand?

and what would you do with it? Do You Choose Evil Or Do You Choose Good?

                                                                                                  - Sci-Man 

Edited by sci-man

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Steel is itself an alloy(iron and carbon).

I think basically percentages of the metals that go into it will determine properties. Temperatures should play a role too.

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Posted (edited)

It depends what you want to use the alloy for. If you need light aircraft or car parts titanium is used as its very light. if weight is not an issue and you want to forge a good knife you’d use s35vn steel or some other alloy which is much harder than titanium. If you’d make an alloy out of carbon steel and titanium you would end up with an alloy which is much softer than carbon steel and just a tiny bit lighter. Ceramics are used when high temperature operation is needed...like plates on the Space Shuttle or racing car breaks.

http://knifeinformer.com/knife-steel-composition-chart/

Edited by koti

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2 minutes ago, John Cuthber said:

It's hardly a "New alloy"- there's a wiki page about it.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ferrotitanium

I suspect it would be brittle.

Titanium is not that hard compared to steel, there are much harder alloys, cheap 440c steel is way harder than titanium. The „magic” of titanium is that its ridiciulously light. 

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The main benefit that titanium brings is its increased fracture toughness.

Hard steel alloys mostly have low fracture toughness compared to more ductile steels.
Some are reduced to similar values to the aluminium in coke can.

There are other cheaper alloying elements, chromium, nickel and vanadium, that also confer a measure of stainless corrosion resistance.
I am not sure of the corrosion resistance conferred by titanium.

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9 hours ago, studiot said:

The main benefit that titanium brings is its increased fracture toughness.

Hard steel alloys mostly have low fracture toughness compared to more ductile steels.
Some are reduced to similar values to the aluminium in coke can.

There are other cheaper alloying elements, chromium, nickel and vanadium, that also confer a measure of stainless corrosion resistance.
I am not sure of the corrosion resistance conferred by titanium.

I don’t know about other uses but amongst knife makers, titanium is unacceptable as a high end knife material. It doesn’t come close to s35vn, s30v or m390 steel alloys as hardness/chipping/holding an edge is concerned. All of the mentioned steel alloys are carbon/vanadium/nickel alloys and do not contain any titanium. I don’t know much about aviation/aerospace materials but I would presume that since ceramics and carbon is used in high end cars it is also used in aero technology? 

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I believe the aerospace industry is still the largest user of Titanium.
It basically combines the high strength of steel with the light-weight of Aluminum, along with better corrosion and temperature resistance than Aluminum.
It is expensive to work and has lost a lot of its shine compared to composite materials ( the preferred choice for strength and lightness ), but still sees applications in hi-temp and/or hi-stress areas ( of turbine engines for example ).

As far as its chemical properties are concerned, the only thing I remember from Gr. 13 Chemistry, is that Titanium will burn in a Nitrogen atmosphere.

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Posted (edited)
10 hours ago, koti said:

I don’t know about other uses but amongst knife makers, titanium is unacceptable as a high end knife material. It doesn’t come close to s35vn, s30v or m390 steel alloys as hardness/chipping/holding an edge is concerned. All of the mentioned steel alloys are carbon/vanadium/nickel alloys and do not contain any titanium. I don’t know much about aviation/aerospace materials but I would presume that since ceramics and carbon is used in high end cars it is also used in aero technology? 

 

Not sure how this is a response to my post, but I note I omitted the reference to the Nippon steel report.

Sorry about that.

http://www.nssmc.com/en/tech/report/nsc/pdf/6215.pdf

 

6 hours ago, MigL said:

I believe the aerospace industry is still the largest user of Titanium.
It basically combines the high strength of steel with the light-weight of Aluminum, along with better corrosion and temperature resistance than Aluminum.
It is expensive to work and has lost a lot of its shine compared to composite materials ( the preferred choice for strength and lightness ), but still sees applications in hi-temp and/or hi-stress areas ( of turbine engines for example ).

As far as its chemical properties are concerned, the only thing I remember from Gr. 13 Chemistry, is that Titanium will burn in a Nitrogen atmosphere.

 

One materials science point is that most steels have a fatigue life long enough to be considered indefinite.

Alloying additions to iron need to be chosen to avoid changing this and a modest % titanium achieves this requirement.

This is quite unlike most aluminium alloys, a point driven home by the Comet 4 disasters.

The equally disastrous failure of the Liberty ships was induced by fast fracture in the welds, not the primary steel.

As a matter of interest some of my more interesting recent work (just before retirement) was gas flow design for welded stainless steel and titanium pipework associated with aero engines.

Edited by studiot

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Wasn't at RR, was it ?

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thank you guys for replying i had forgotten about this post a while ago and just found it i also forgot about that wiki article when i wrote this so thanks for that also thanks for putting up with my arrogance. 

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