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magnetic field of a hydrogen proton


Tor Fredrik
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How strong is the magnetic field that a hydrogen electron experiences from a hydrogen proton when the electron is in s1?

 

 

The hyperfine splitting is 1420 MHz, and is equal to u.B

http://farside.ph.utexas.edu/teaching/qmech/Quantum/node109.html

 

The electron magnetic moment is almost exactly a Bohr magneton, which is 14 Ghz/T

 

So, about 0.1 Tesla, on average, using a classical approximation of a quantum system.

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I wondered if I could ask about something else: Does the hydrogen electron change spin direction by itself or does it need help from another force? And if it changes by itself. How large is the energy that it emitts as E=hf equal to? I assume that the spin is -0.5 or 0.5 as predicted by stern gerlach.

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I wondered if I could ask about something else: Does the hydrogen electron change spin direction by itself or does it need help from another force? And if it changes by itself. How large is the energy that it emitts as E=hf equal to? I assume that the spin is -0.5 or 0.5 as predicted by stern gerlach.

 

 

The number quoted in the link is 5.88 micro eV

 

You need an interaction to flip the spin, because energy is conserved. It can happen with a photon absorption or emission (e.g. in a maser). The lifetime for spontaneous emission is really long — about 10 million years. We only see this radiation because there's a whole bunch of hydrogen out there. But that long lifetime means the transition is narrow, meaning it makes a pretty good clock.

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I wondered if I could ask about another thing. What causes the circular movement for an electron in a hydrogen. Is it magnetic forces or something else?

 

I read that these elementary particles did not actually physically spin around their axis? That it's merely an oversimplification to make things comprehensible?

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The bohr model of orbitals is indeed outdated. It is taught as a simplification of the current model. Orbitals nowadays refer to an electron probability density.

I guess I know that they don't go in circles and are located somewhere around the proton at any time and that their paths for all I know can be one of any route as long it is in the viscinity of the proton. But with that electron probability cloud I have the same question I guess. What force makes the electron fuzz around the electron. One force is the electrical force between the electron and the proton. But that one is more denying the electron to leave and should not give it velocity. What force gives the electron velocity.

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I guess I know that they don't go in circles and are located somewhere around the proton at any time and that their paths for all I know can be one of any route as long it is in the viscinity of the proton. But with that electron probability cloud I have the same question I guess. What force makes the electron fuzz around the electron. One force is the electrical force between the electron and the proton. But that one is more denying the electron to leave and should not give it velocity. What force gives the electron velocity.

 

 

There are do defined trajectories, nor are there defined velocities. The electron is, in essence, everywhere, with a spherically symmetric probability distribution that peaks at the Bohr radius. There's no force that does this; it's an inherent nature — everything behaves as a wave, even if we don't notice that for macroscopic objects. When the electron is bound to a proton, the system has a certain energy — it sheds 13.6 eV relative to an unbound system. So this energy doesn't have to come from anywhere since it's smaller than having free particles.

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