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Why? the need of an air compressor at a nuclear plant.


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Well in term "vessel"is offend used as a substitute to ReactorThe chamber or the containment is the same thing. the Reactor is placed from the field to the containment with a 500 tons crane .

So why are you asking separately about the reactor vessel and reactor chamber? I answered the question above about why it's pressurized?

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So why are you asking separately about the reactor vessel and reactor chamber? I answered the question above about why it's pressurized?

[your quote=At higher pressure, water boils at a higher temperature. The water (steam) therefore contains more energy, and producing energy is the whole point.

At higher pressure, water boils at a higher temperature. The water (steam) therefore contains more energy, and producing energy is the whole point.

the containment vessel do not contain water only the reactor nothing else it is seal to any other environment .

 

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No, that's wrong. Something is flowing, transferring the heat. Often water. The entire system is sealed off.

 

The thing that is sealed from the coolant (and moderator, in case it's not the coolant) would be the fuel elements. Which are not pressurized, being a solid.

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No, that's wrong. Something is flowing, transferring the heat. Often water. The entire system is sealed off.

 

The thing that is sealed from the coolant (and moderator, in case it's not the coolant) would be the fuel elements. Which are not pressurized, being a solid.

I agree the piping that feed the the water end the coolant reactor is present in the chamber; but why is the chamber that contain the reactor is pressurized not much psi but a little . but
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I agree the piping that feed the the water end the coolant reactor is present in the chamber; but why is the chamber that contain the reactor is pressurized not much psi but a little . but

 

Please rephrase this in English.

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When I worked for DuPont compressed air was one of the major energy sources we used, Dowtherm, electricity, compressed air, steam, a coal fired power plant was used to generate everything but electricity. One major use of compressed air was to generate vacuums. We made Dacron Polyester. Any industrial site uses energy in many forms. Not sure why a nuclear power plant would be any different...

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I agree. The piping that feed the the water and the coolant to the reactor is present in the chamber;_ but why? ~ is the chamber, that contains the reactor is pressurized ;not much psi but a little . but

I would think that monitoring a slight pressure would be the quickest way to detect a breach of the containment structure.

Possibly a very small crack somewhere inaccessible to normal operations.

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I agree the piping that feed the the water end the coolant reactor is present in the chamber; but why is the chamber that contain the reactor is pressurized not much psi but a little . but

That is the chamber that contains the reactor.

 

http://ffden-2.phys.uaf.edu/webproj/212_spring_2015/Jackson_Page/jackson_page/pg6.html

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In several of the Nuclear Power plants I worked on (designing) we had double valves on all pipelines exiting the reactor containment building. No valve is perfect (they all will leak-- even if only a tiny amount). Safety regulations required that we test the valves periodically to ensure leakage was within the acceptable range. We did this by pressurizing the space between the two valves with compressed air and measuring the rate of air loss. This was a very good test, because normally the lines contain water, so using air amplified the leakage (compared to water) and gave us a test of adequate sensitivity.

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In several of the Nuclear Power plants I worked on (designing) we had double valves on all pipelines exiting the reactor containment building. No valve is perfect (they all will leak-- even if only a tiny amount). Safety regulations required that we test the valves periodically to ensure leakage was within the acceptable range. We did this by pressurizing the space between the two valves with compressed air and measuring the rate of air loss. This was a very good test, because normally the lines contain water, so using air amplified the leakage (compared to water) and gave us a test of adequate sensitivity.

Very interesting OldChemE thans!

Thanks for the [pictures.
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Patent for "Liquid nitrogen emergency cooling system for nuclear power plants "

https://www.google.com/patents/US20150380115

 

"A reactor cooling system for cooling a nuclear reactor using nitrogen comprising a refrigeration unit for cooling and compressing nitrogen gas into liquid nitrogen, a liquids storage tank to store liquid nitrogen, the tank in fluid communication with the refrigeration unit, a heat exchanger drop system in fluid communication with the liquids storage tank, adjacent to the nuclear reactor, wherein the nitrogen absorbs heat by becoming gaseous, a tank for receiving and holding nitrogen gas in fluid communication with the heat exchanger and in fluid communication with the refrigeration unit, and where the system is a closed-loop drop system."

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Patent for "Liquid nitrogen emergency cooling system for nuclear power plants "

https://www.google.com/patents/US20150380115

 

"A reactor cooling system for cooling a nuclear reactor using nitrogen comprising a refrigeration unit for cooling and compressing nitrogen gas into liquid nitrogen, a liquids storage tank to store liquid nitrogen, the tank in fluid communication with the refrigeration unit, a heat exchanger drop system in fluid communication with the liquids storage tank, adjacent to the nuclear reactor, wherein the nitrogen absorbs heat by becoming gaseous, a tank for receiving and holding nitrogen gas in fluid communication with the heat exchanger and in fluid communication with the refrigeration unit, and where the system is a closed-loop drop system."

your are taking about a ''nuke for Submarine'' Edited by Roger Dynamic Motion
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