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The pH Value of Blood and chronic Diseases


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Chronic diseases like diabetes or celiac disease are believed to be only handled by specific external medication or/and a diet. I try to provide a theory for many or nearly all chronic diseases.

A fact is that the pH value of blood is highly important for the health of the body. With a pH value below 7 you are going to die. I try to make clear that the pH value of blood is the basic indicator for any chronic disease that could occur in humans. Why is that? As I pointed out in a former post, the pH value is of immense importance because blood is present throughout the whole body except of the cornea of the eye. Its pH value is in the range of 7.35 - 7.45. Since blood is available throughout the whole body, it influences all other pH values for example that of the liver, the lungs, the pancreas etc.

If the pancreas is damaged it loose sooner or later the ability to produce insulin. This problem is the result of the acidity of the pancreas. The questions are first: How to prevent this state? And second: If the problem already occurred, is it possible to regain a healthy pancreas?

In order to prevent the state one can eat healthy, that means one needs to eat in a way that the pH value of blood maintains its value between 7.35 and 7.45. However it should be controlled if the pH value of the pancreas is around 8. If the pH value is too far away from 8, I propose to vary the pH value of blood because even the range from 7.35 - 7.45 is highly sensitive. The step from pH value of 7.35 - 7.36 takes only, incorporating the buffering mechanism of hydrogen ion concentration through the bicarbonate/carbon acid mechanism, 20x2=40 hydrogen ions per litre. Thus the change of the pH value of blood within the empiric range of 0.01 is much more than extremely sensitive, if you know that the number of molecules in an aqueous solution is about ten to the power of twenty three. That’s a number with twenty three zeros before the dot!

The additional second question is: Can one regain the production of insulin in some way? I think this depends on any individual person. I think, there are many cases where the pancreas can regain its operability, because everyone should do a blood sugar once a year.

 

There are two ways to restore the pH value of blood if it is too low. First: Eat food that leads to an alkalic state of blood and second perform an undercooling of the blood because this raises also the pH value. The undercooling is commonly undertaken, if operations are done.

 

It should be clear that for everyone an individuell diet and/or if possible an also individuell undercooling procedure plan should be developed. This is definitely an alternative for pharmaceutical treatments.

 

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Diet has practically no influence on blood pH. Partly because the blood is strongly buffered

Partly because there are a bunch of homoeostasis mechanisms in place.

 

Diet mainly influences the pH of the urine- just in case you wondered.

 

Re "The step from pH value of 7.35 - 7.36 takes only, incorporating the buffering mechanism of hydrogen ion concentration through the bicarbonate/carbon acid mechanism, 20x2=40 hydrogen ions per litre."

You will need to show the working there.

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Well, it has an influence. Buffering has its boundaries. Just read my new post.

!

Moderator Note

You are only permitted one thread on a given topic. Furthermore, you are required to support your claims with evidence and engage in discussion. This is not a place to advertise your blog.

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Well, it has an influence. Buffering has its boundaries. Just read my new post.

Your last post didn't make sense, why should I read any further ones.

 

Rather than new posts that may introduce further nonsense, why not answer the question I asked here?

Show how you came to the conclusion that "he step from pH value of 7.35 - 7.36 takes only ... 40 hydrogen ions per litre."

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I've posted again my new post, where I make an attempt to explain why the pH value of the human body is so sensitive. Why can't I show experimental evidence yet? Because no one was experimentally doing research on this! But if you calculate the difference of the hydrogen ions per litre between pH 7.35 and pH 7.45 you come to the fact that it is including the bicarbonate/carbon acid buffer, which provides a 20:1 range, 400 hydrogen ions per litre. That's nothing! So the pH value plays an important role in the function of the body. There might be something else, besides the buffer mechanism, which is influencing the pH value? So, what is it? This needs further research!


The difference between pH 7.35 and 7.36 is 7.36x6x10^23-7.35x6x10^23=44.16x10^23-44.1x10^23=0.06x10^23=6x10^21. Well, my error. Sorry. I've to think further on this.

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I've posted again my new post, where I make an attempt to explain why the pH value of the human body is so sensitive. Why can't I show experimental evidence yet? Because no one was experimentally doing research on this! But if you calculate the difference of the hydrogen ions per litre between pH 7.35 and pH 7.45 you come to the fact that it is including the bicarbonate/carbon acid buffer, which provides a 20:1 range, 400 hydrogen ions per litre. That's nothing! So the pH value plays an important role in the function of the body. There might be something else, besides the buffer mechanism, which is influencing the pH value? So, what is it? This needs further research!

The difference between pH 7.35 and 7.36 is 7.36x6x10^23-7.35x6x10^23=44.16x10^23-44.1x10^23=0.06x10^23=6x10^21. Well, my error. Sorry. I've to think further on this.

 

Methinks you don't know what pH is. Your math is way, way off.

 

FYI:

 

pH = -log[H+]

 

[H+] = 10-pH

 

Knowing the above, I get a difference of about 5.53 x 1015 atoms / L of H+ between pH values of 7.35 and 7.45.

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I've calculated more precisely. The difference between pH 7.36 -7.35 compared with the pH of water is around 1,200,000 hydrogen ions (including the buffer system) per litre. That's compared to the number of hydrogen ions in water, which is 4.2x10^20 not that a big number. I would say, that the system is still sensitive to the pH of blood.


One mol is 6x10^23 atoms or molecules, i thought.

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I've calculated more precisely. The difference between pH 7.36 -7.35 compared with the pH of water is around 1,200,000 hydrogen ions (including the buffer system) per litre. That's compared to the number of hydrogen ions in water, which is 4.2x10^20 not that a big number. I would say, that the system is still sensitive to the pH of blood.

One mol is 6x10^23 atoms or molecules, i thought.

 

Still wrong. Could you show your working?

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Okay, my fault. Thus 6x10^15.65-6x10^15.55=6x10^15x10^0.65-6x10^15x10^0.55=0.03x10^17 including the buffer system, which gives a factor of 20 it gives 6x10^16. That's the hydrogen ion number of water which is 6x10^23-7=6x10^16 hydrogen ions per litre. Now the system needs indeed a lot of alcohol to become destabilised, since H++OH-<-H2O, if alcohol is added. However the pH value of blood needs not to be stressed that much. The same is it with when you eat too much acid producing food.

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That's sort of an improvement, but where did you get "10^15.65" from?

Anyway.

A litre of solution at pH 7.35 contains 10^ -7.35 moles of hydrogen ions per litre

4.4668359215096311855625052431938e-8 moles

And at pH 7.36 you similarly get

4.3651583224016596746383499610535e-8

moles

 

So the difference is

1.016775991079715109241552821403e-9

moles

A mole is 6.022 * 10^23 hydrogen ions so

The difference between the number of hydrogen ions in a litre of solution at pH 7.35 as opposed to one at pH 7.36 is the product of those last two numbers

Which my calculator gives as

612302501828204

 

which is rather more than 40

You seem to be out by a factor of about 15 million million.

(Buffering makes it even worse)

The fact that you didn't notice that indicates that you don't have a "feel" for what you are doing- presumably because you simply don't understand it.

Perhaps you should stop telling people what to do until you find out what you are talking about.

 

You are clearly not in a position to make statements like "It should be clear that for everyone an individuell diet and/or if possible an also individuell undercooling procedure plan should be developed. This is definitely an alternative for pharmaceutical treatments."

The 15.65 comes about by simplifying the term, (6.022*10^23)*(10^-7.35), which would give 6.022*10^(23-7.35), or 6.022*10^15.65. That part is fine, though it does seem that we're now talking again about the difference between pH 7.35 and pH 7.45.

 

The part following that initial statement of 6*10^15.65-6*10^15.55 (which does not equal 0.03*10^17) makes absolutely no sense, however. OP: Where on earth does this factor of twenty come from? Do you actually know how buffers work? Are you aware that alcohol and hydroxide are not the same thing? Why do you insist that eating acidic food changes the blood pH?

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The 15.65 comes about by simplifying the term, (6.022*10^23)*(10^-7.35), which would give 6.022*10^(23-7.35), or 6.022*10^15.65. That part is fine, though it does seem that we're now talking again about the difference between pH 7.35 and pH 7.45.

 

The part following that initial statement of 6*10^15.65-6*10^15.55 (which does not equal 0.03*10^17) makes absolutely no sense, however. OP: Where on earth does this factor of twenty come from? Do you actually know how buffers work? Are you aware that alcohol and hydroxide are not the same thing? Why do you insist that eating acidic food changes the blood pH?

It gets confusing if you quote me, then critique the OP's work,

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The factor 20:1, I found on a link in the internet. It represents the carbon acid/bicarbonate buffer. And if you don't like the equation H++OH-<-H2O, I come up with the organic chemistry equation: carbon acid + alcohol<-ester + water. The sign <- indicates a heavy use of alcohol. The pH value in blood decides what happens to the body. That's a proposition. It needs to be done experimental research on this. However I can come up with an example regarding my own health. Some time ago I was diagnosed with an arthrosis. I found a German resource which said that arthrosis is a product of over acidity. So I started with an alkaline vegan diet and after some weeks the pain started to disappear. Soon the pain vanished. Some other people reported, that it took them month or a year until the pain vanished but it did.

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What does esterification have to do with the carbonate buffer found in our blood? My issue with your equation was not with the chemical equation, but with your math. It makes no sense, and is wrong. The "factor" you cite has no meaning. I do strongly recommend you spend some time reading up on fundamental chemistry.

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The factor 20:1, I found on a link in the internet. It represents the carbon acid/bicarbonate buffer. And if you don't like the equation H++OH-<-H2O, I come up with the organic chemistry equation: carbon acid + alcohol<-ester + water. The sign <- indicates a heavy use of alcohol. The pH value in blood decides what happens to the body. That's a proposition. It needs to be done experimental research on this. However I can come up with an example regarding my own health. Some time ago I was diagnosed with an arthrosis. I found a German resource which said that arthrosis is a product of over acidity. So I started with an alkaline vegan diet and after some weeks the pain started to disappear. Soon the pain vanished. Some other people reported, that it took them month or a year until the pain vanished but it did.

A vegan diet isn't "alkaline" (or "acid").

It might have helped your condition- or it might have been a coincidence.

But the pH of your blood is 7.35 today, and it was 7.35 when your joints were causing you pain.

 

For example, if the joint pain was caused by gout then diet will certainly affect it.

But it doesn't change the pH of the blood.

(part of the effect of diet on gout could be to change the pH of the urine)

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Not every vegan food you eat is forming automatically an alkaline blood pH. That is true. You need to look for food, which results in an alkaline pH value of the blood. And there are lists on the net. For example pasta is not an alkaline producing food, but potatoes is. And there is still food where is no common sense if it is producing an alkaline pH value. But fruits f.e. is an excellent example of producing a change of the pH value into the correct direction. I've only a German source in case of arthrosis but it should be applicable to other problems too. That book is written by Eckhard K. Fisseler: "Arthrose - Der Weg zur Selbstheilung" (Hans Nietsch-Verlag). The problem of arthrosis is according to Prof. Dr. med. Lothar Wendt caused by an acidity of the human body. Because the blood is nearly reaching everywhere in the body except the corneal of the human eye, it is going to be affected. It seems so that slight changes of the pH value of blood are causing f.e. arthrosis or as I propose other 'chronic' diseases too. To evaluate the exact circumstances there should be undertaken research in that direction. Remember I am not the only one who applied the alkaline vegan diet and whose pain is gone.

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Not every vegan food you eat is forming automatically an alkaline blood pH. That is true. You need to look for food, which results in an alkaline pH value of the blood. And there are lists on the net. For example pasta is not an alkaline producing food, but potatoes is. And there is still food where is no common sense if it is producing an alkaline pH value. But fruits f.e. is an excellent example of producing a change of the pH value into the correct direction. I've only a German source in case of arthrosis but it should be applicable to other problems too. That book is written by Eckhard K. Fisseler: "Arthrose - Der Weg zur Selbstheilung" (Hans Nietsch-Verlag). The problem of arthrosis is according to Prof. Dr. med. Lothar Wendt caused by an acidity of the human body. Because the blood is nearly reaching everywhere in the body except the corneal of the human eye, it is going to be affected. It seems so that slight changes of the pH value of blood are causing f.e. arthrosis or as I propose other 'chronic' diseases too. To evaluate the exact circumstances there should be undertaken research in that direction. Remember I am not the only one who applied the alkaline vegan diet and whose pain is gone.

All wrong. And you haven't addressed the issues raised with your earlier posts regarding your bad math.

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Well, the healthy pH range is between 7.35 and 7.45. That's correct. But every individual has its own range within the range of 7.35 and 7.45 and why can't it be between 7.35 and 7.36 for some specific individual and for another between 7.42 and 7.44. That's what I propose. That's a proposition and it is not disproved. And my own experience is that I was diagnosed with arthrosis and that was gone after several weeks, and I am not the only one who experienced this. I know that most physicians doesn't believe it, but who says that the majority is always right? You cannot say that what I say is all wrong. You have no proof for this.

 

The problem with 'chronic' diseases is that usually they appear some time in life and no one seems to know why is that. A specific environment and wrong food are possible reasons which are influencing it. Genetic mutation? But what is the cause for this?

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Well, the healthy pH range is between 7.35 and 7.45. That's correct. But every individual has its own range within the range of 7.35 and 7.45 and why can't it be between 7.35 and 7.36 for some specific individual and for another between 7.42 and 7.44. That's what I propose. That's a proposition and it is not disproved. And my own experience is that I was diagnosed with arthrosis and that was gone after several weeks, and I am not the only one who experienced this. I know that most physicians doesn't believe it, but who says that the majority is always right? You cannot say that what I say is all wrong. You have no proof for this.

 

The problem with 'chronic' diseases is that usually they appear some time in life and no one seems to know why is that. A specific environment and wrong food are possible reasons which are influencing it. Genetic mutation? But what is the cause for this?

Food still doesn't change blood pH.

If you make a suggestion like "very individual has its own range within the range of 7.35 and 7.45 and why can't it be between 7.35 and 7.36 for some specific individual and for another between 7.42 and 7.44. " without any evidence, I can dismiss it without evidence.

" And my own experience is that I was diagnosed with arthrosis and that was gone after several weeks, and I am not the only one who experienced this."

Come back with real data; or don't come back.

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Well, can you disproof that the pH value of blood isn't changed by f.e. alcohol? Why doesn't food change the pH of blood? Can you explain this? Does in your theory the pH of any organ or region of the body changes, if you for example drink too much? If you say it doesn't, than why not? And the experience of many people, including myself, who experienced that arthrosis is gone by staying on a alkalic vegan diet is not an evidence that the body was before in a wrong condition regarding the pH value of blood. What else could it be?

 

What do you mean by real data then?

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Well, can you disproof that the pH value of blood isn't changed by f.e. alcohol? Why doesn't food change the pH of blood? Can you explain this? Does in your theory the pH of any organ or region of the body changes, if you for example drink too much? If you say it doesn't, than why not? And the experience of many people, including myself, who experienced that arthrosis is gone by staying on a alkalic vegan diet is not an evidence that the body was before in a wrong condition regarding the pH value of blood. What else could it be?

 

What do you mean by real data then?

Because the blood is buffered. Can you offer evidence to suggest it does change pH? You're the one making the claims here, no one else. It's your job to support them.

 

What else could it be? What were you eating before? You cannot say that it's anything to do with pH. Perhaps it's just the general diet change. Perhaps it was just a random thing that fixed itself. Perhaps it's placebo.

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