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Water dissociation

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Which methods are best in water molecules dissociation to obtain OH- and H+ ? Lasers, microwaves, electric current?

Which methods are most energy efficient to obtain as much as possible ions at a time?

Which frequency have to be used?

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Be careful what you wish for, lest it comes true.

 

H+ is only a bookkeeping quantity in relation to water.

 

Look here

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydronium

 

(also calleed hydroxonium

 

and here

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrogen_ion

 

Safety note

Passage of electric current will only get you hydrogen and oxygen gas and a large bang if you are not careful.

 

Specify your needs more thoroughly.

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Last time I checked, pulling molecules apart was usually thought of as chemistry.

 

I'm also fairly sure that an arc in lowish pressure water vapour will produce H+ and OH-

 

(Among a stack of other things)

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Is there any substance in which water can dissolve?

Yes, lots of things.

The best known is probably alcohol, but also glycerine or sulphuric acid.

 

Even things like gasoline will dissolve a little water.

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Yes, lots of things.

The best known is probably alcohol, but also glycerine or sulphuric acid.

 

Even things like gasoline will dissolve a little water.

 

Are you sure that if we mix water and ethanol together, ethanol and not water would be a solvent?

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It depends on the concentration. I guess the one with the highest concentration would be the solvent, but it is only semantics.

Edited by Bender

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Is there any solid-state substance which can work as an efficient water solvent?

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On a cold day dimethylsulphoxide and acetic acid are solids but if you add water they become liquids.
Which material dissolved which?


 

Are you sure that if we mix water and ethanol together, ethanol and not water would be a solvent?

If you do this at -10 C it's pretty clear that the liquid alcohol acts as a solvent for the solid ice.

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On a cold day dimethylsulphoxide and acetic acid are solids but if you add water they become liquids.

Which material dissolved which?

If you do this at -10 C it's pretty clear that the liquid alcohol acts as a solvent for the solid ice.

 

No. I need some substance which stays solid in wide temperature range and remains solid on contact with water. Only water suppose to dissociate on contact with that substance.

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That's not a realistic goal.

Water is fairly stable and doesn't dissociate.

There are things (like sodium) that react with it.

What are you trying to do?

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No. I need some substance which stays solid in wide temperature range and remains solid on contact with water. Only water suppose to dissociate on contact with that substance.

 

Dissociating water requires an energy source.

 

A block of tungsten heated to say 3,000K, will cause water molecules at and around its surface to dissociate until the system comes to thermal equilibrium and rates of dissociation/recombination equalise.

 

The choice of tungsten is purely to meet your requirement for the agent to be a solid at temperatures where the degree of water dissociation is significant.

 

EDIT: Okay reread the OP. Looking for ionic dissociation rather than H2 and O2. Hence off-topic (I think).

Edited by sethoflagos

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