Jump to content

limits of different functions


bahozkaleez
 Share

Recommended Posts

What is your definition of f'(x) ?

 

Are you sure the question does not say

 

If f(x) is differentiable at xo then prove that.....etc ?

 

Consider the differentiability of f(x) = |x| and of f(x) =x2 at xo = 0

 

 

 

Edited by studiot
Link to comment
Share on other sites

What is your definition of f'(x) ?

 

Are you sure the question does not say

 

If f(x) is differentiable at xo then prove that.....etc ?

 

Consider f(x) = |x| at xo = 0

 

I've lost all my maths skills (except for statistics), but we always denoted the derivative function of f(x) as f'(x).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am currently reading a book on calculus and I have come across a problem which I can't solve. I do feel like the answer is something simple. Please note that I am fairly new to calculus.

 

attachicon.gifmathz.PNG

 

Thank you.

[latex]\frac{f(x_0+\Delta x)-f(x_0-\Delta x)}{2 \Delta x}=\frac{f(x_0+\Delta x)-f(x_0)+f(x_0)-f(x_0-\Delta x)}{2 \Delta x}[/latex]

 

"mathematic" beat me to it

Edited by zztop
Link to comment
Share on other sites

[latex]\frac{f(x_0+\Delta x)-f(x_0-\Delta x)}{2 \Delta x}=\frac{f(x_0+\Delta x)-f(x_0)+f(x_0)-f(x_0-\Delta x)}{2 \Delta x}[/latex]

 

"mathematic" beat me to it

Thank you, this really helped me.

Edited by bahozkaleez
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.