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Haya

Is this equation right?

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CO2+H2O=CH4

 

Obviously it's not right, as Hydrogen atoms on the left (side of equation), does not match Hydrogen atoms on the right,

Oxygens atoms on the left, does not match Oxygen atoms on the right..

 

ps. Are you in the 1st class of the primary school.. ?

Edited by Sensei

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bah details :)

just add another water molecule!

 

???

 

CO2+ 2 H2O -> CH4

Still does not match...

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Let's take it the other way:

 

CH4 + 2O2 = CO2 + 2H2O

 

The equation balances and portrays the burning of methane in oxygen. So the OP really seems to be asking "Is this a reaction that can be driven in the opposite direction?"

 

I imagine that under high pressures and possibly high temperature it might be possible, but my gut reaction (very scientific) is no. Where are the chemists?

 

Edit: It occurs to me that since the reactions shown is exothermic, then the reverse reaction if possible would benefit from high temperatures. i.e my "possibly high temperature" would become "and definitely high temperature".

Edited by Ophiolite

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???

 

CO2+ 2 H2O -> CH4

Still does not match...

CO2 + 2H2O ---> CH4 + 2O2

Edited by StringJunky

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Methane from water and carbon dioxide? Cool!

 

You would have 2O2 left over i think. And you would need something to "make it happen"

 

 

 

Obviously it's not right, as Hydrogen atoms on the left (side of equation), does not match Hydrogen atoms on the right,

Oxygens atoms on the left, does not match Oxygen atoms on the right..

 

ps. Are you in the 1st class of the primary school.. ?

 

 

bah details :)

just add another water molecule!

 

 

 

???

 

CO2+ 2 H2O -> CH4

Still does not match...

 

 

got me stumped :):confused:

 

 

 

Forget balancing, is the equation possible???

 

 

Let's take it the other way:

 

CH4 + 2O2 = CO2 + 2H2O

 

The equation balances and portrays the burning of methane in oxygen. So the OP really seems to be asking "Is this a reaction that can be driven in the opposite direction?"

 

I imagine that under high pressures and possibly high temperature it might be possible, but my gut reaction (very scientific) is no. Where are the chemists?

 

Edit: It occurs to me that since the reactions shown is exothermic, then the reverse reaction if possible would benefit from high temperatures. i.e my "possibly high temperature" would become "and definitely high temperature".

 

 

Apparently archaea can metabolise this reaction. Have no idea if the article is correct. Its very vague.

 

http://www.zdnet.com/article/h2o-co2-ch4-thanks-to-archaeans/

 

 

CO2 + 2H2O ---> CH4 + 2O2

 

 

Interesting, but I suspect there would be a plethora of intermediate products, which is not quite the same thing.

I read it on the internet and i thought it was wrong. I just wanted to make sure about it. What i know that carbon dioxide and steam give off H2CO3 that is a weak, unstable acid.

CH4 + 2O2 ---> CO2 + 2H2O

CO2 + 2H2O ---> CH4 + 2O2

May be the first reaction is driven in the opposite direction as shown in the second reaction, but it seems that it needs high pressure and temperature. However, it may be wrong after all.

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The first reaction is indeed possible as it is the combustion of methane.

The reverse reaction is doubted, extreme temperature and pressure may facilitate it.

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The first reaction is indeed possible as it is the combustion of methane.

The reverse reaction is doubted, extreme temperature and pressure may facilitate it.

Is there an echo in here?

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