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Theorizing Factors Behind Quantum Field Phenomena


hannanahmad
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I was watching this video on Higgs Boson.

I have been making attempts to theorize a model of matter, energy and empty space that can fit on everything in the universe. What I have come across is this Quantum field theory that says for every field there is a particle as its ground reason. It is understandable easily.

But when I try to say something about the reality of particles, I want to know if the same 'field' phenomena acts within bodies or beings of these particles or this topic has been unexplored until now that how these particles are forming, moving, stabilizing and interacting at the micro levels of their being.

If you do not know then can you refer me to a proper source of information?

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Yes, I have studied Physics up to MS level and Quantum Mechanics is one of the subjects that I studied. Let me give it a different shape.

On basis of mathematical calculation, we say that an infinite amount of energy is required to travel at the speed of light, what is the physical significance of this infinite amount of energy? How to physically describe the 'infinite amount of energy'? It is only one side.

What I want to know is if any attempts to explain the structures of subatomic particles (beyond quarks, etc.) have been made?

Is there any attempts to simulate a whole Neutron, Proton, Quark, Boson, Atom, etc. in a computer, just like as they have been successful in the case of big bang, etc.?

Any sources of information in this regard?

 

I am saying all this because I often fantasize on how to uncover the principles that govern the physical being of the above, sometime reach a few conclusions and devise it in a scientific method, then stuck somewhere, etc. I have some thoughts that I want to share but I don't know what's the ideal way to do this.

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Earnshaw's you can pick up from the net.

 

For Noether's, which is the one you most need, since it underlies pretty well everything else, try

 

Emmy Noether's Wonderful Theorem

 

Neuenschwander

 

John Hopkins University Press

 

for a first reading.

Edited by studiot
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Well sounds like you may find this resource handy. Particularly if your math skills is up to it.

 

http://arxiv.org/abs/hepth/9912205 : "Fields" - A free lengthy technical training manual on classical and quantum fields.

 

Another handy online resource is

 

http://www.damtp.cam.ac.uk/user/tong/qft.html

 

You will numerous lecture notes here. The subject is immense I would also recommend studying feyman diagrams, [latex]\phi^4 [/latex] theory, Hamiltons and Langrange's

 

The first article has an excellent listing of different field theories. Should come in handy.

 

You will need a good understanding of particle physics, relativity and obviously strong math skills. For the particle physics side. These two articles are handy.

http://arxiv.org/abs/0810.3328 A Simple Introduction to Particle Physics

 

http://arxiv.org/abs/0908.1395 part 2

 

Though if you can buy textbooks Quarks and Leptons is an intro to Particle physics. Also any books by David Griffith are handy. In particular his Introductory to particle physics.

Edited by Mordred
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  • 4 months later...

Has there been any model devised or under research that can explain the physical nature of sub-atomic particles?

 

I am talking about a model that can explain the physical being of even quarks and all what LHC is revealing.

 

Is there any?

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Has there been any model devised or under research that can explain the physical nature of sub-atomic particles?

 

I am talking about a model that can explain the physical being of even quarks and all what LHC is revealing.

 

Is there any?

 

 

Quantum theory.

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... On basis of mathematical calculation, we say that an infinite amount of energy is required to travel at the speed of light, what is the physical significance of this infinite amount of energy? How to physically describe the 'infinite amount of energy'?

An infinite amount of energy is required to get a particle with mass (electron/proton..) to travel at the speed of light, but massless particles (energy in the form of photons) zoom along at the speed of light with no problem.

 

"Physical significance"? Purely as a thought experiment I will try an example. Consider a different way to think of this issue. You are using energy to make the particle move faster and energy moves at the speed of light. Could you get an object to move as fast or faster then then the object you are throwing at it? You could if the collision was "elastic" like a pool game where the balls bounce off each other. What about if the collision was "in-elastic" where the colliding particles stick together?

 

In the words of Einstein:

 

"Radiation carries inertia between emitting and absorbing bodies". It is important that not only does something receive a "kick" from the momentum of the energy, but the internal inertia (i.e., the inertial mass) of the body is actually increased. ie. the collision is "in-elastic".
Now, think about shooting a machine gun at a chunk of lead and assume the chunk of lead absorbs the bullet. As you shoot, the chunk of lead starts to move faster because of this and gets heavier. You will never get the chunk of lead to move at the speed of the bullet, it will move faster and faster, get heavier and heaver, but will never move as fast or faster then the bullets.
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Has there been any model devised or under research that can explain the physical nature of sub-atomic particles?

 

I am talking about a model that can explain the physical being of even quarks and all what LHC is revealing.

 

Is there any?

Yes, check Standard Model

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Yes, check Standard Model

Standard Model leaves me confused between quarks and leptons and etc.

 

I mean is there any model that can explain how quarks and leptons are actually getting their specific properties. How energy is sticking together to give their specific qualities to quarks, leptons and etc. ? Is there any model that can explain how and why energy sticks together that they get their specific characteristics?

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Standard Model leaves me confused between quarks and leptons and etc.

 

I mean is there any model that can explain how quarks and leptons are actually getting their specific properties. How energy is sticking together to give their specific qualities to quarks, leptons and etc. ? Is there any model that can explain how and why energy sticks together that they get their specific characteristics?

You need to make the effort to LEARN the Standard Model. This IS the explanation for your questions, there is no shortcut or dumbed down version,.

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Well, I seriously want to know if there is any model or attempt that can explain how energy sticks together to form particles in the standard model.

 

Standard Model is authentic and I know that. My question is different.

 

Is there anyone to answer this in the right background?

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  • 6 months later...

There is no shortcut method to the questions your asking. The only way to learn those models is to understand the mathematics that led to their predictions in the first place. In which case the model is QFT. I already referred you to Quarks and Leptons there is an excellent chapter in there on how the predictions for quarks and gluons came into being including their original mass estimates. The only way to understand the properties of any quantum particle is to understand the probability density functions under QFT. Including its path integrals, there is no easy way.

 Did you read any of the materials I already provided? some of this information is contained in the Simple introduction to Particle physics articles. Think of interference of wavefunctions, after all every quantum number has a wavefunction probability function.

Edited by Mordred
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We now have this thread for asking questions about Fields in Physics.

If you would like to look there I can develop and expand on the discussion about quantum fields in a way that might help.

 

Meanwhile the Blackie encyclopedia/textbook "The Students Physics" volume 1 Light has some excellent discussion of particles as represented by fields under the heading

"Photons distinguished from corpuscles"

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  • 2 months later...

........................"Did you read any of the materials I already provided? some of this information is contained in the Simple introduction to Particle physics articles. Think of interference of wavefunctions, after all every quantum number has a wavefunction probability function.".....................

 

My question is entirely different. I am still searching for the accurate words to explain myself. I wil raise more practical questions in the future. If I describe myself, then time slows down when particles start moving at speeds closer to the speed of light. Can we use this 'time dilation' feature in Leptons, Bosons, etc. to explain their physical structures, and how their physical structures relate to the speicfic properties or behaviors noted during lab experiments?

 

If anyone makes such an attempt, then where he should go to share his basic mathematical work? Which will be the right group of people to approach for sharing the thoughts. 

Edited by hannanahmad
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Every particle is classified via  a rest mass, this term is older and has been replaced by invariant mass.( the mass all observers agree upon) as the particle speeds up it gains inertial mass (replaced by variant mass)

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