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Omair

Can brain grow new neurons in the cerebrum?

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I have read that the brain, in some regions of the brain, like the hippocampus can repair itself and grow new neurons there. But does neurogenesis happen in the cerebrum?

 

I have been beaten up and bullied my entire life, as a result, I fear I have lost many neurons due to repeated head traumas.

Edited by Omair

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As far as I'm aware of, neurons are not capable of regenerating (note the difference: regeneration is not the same as repair: neurons can repair, but not regenerate) properly in order to form fully functional neural tissues again; you'll always have some sort of fibrous (scar, dysfunctional) tissue replacing the original.

 

Most of the changes happening in the hippocampus, if I recall correctly, are due to changes in synaptic plasticity and changes in which synapses different neurons actually form with one another.

Edited by Function

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Most of the changes happening in the hippocampus, if I recall correctly, are due to changes in synaptic plasticity and changes in which synapses different neurons actually form with one another.

But doesn't that mean, if pathways are damaged the brain will attempt to form new pathways to maintain function in that part that would be rendered dysfunctional in their absence?

Edited by StringJunky

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But doesn't that mean, if pathways are damaged the brain will attempt to form new pathways to maintain function in that part that would be rendered dysfunctional in their absence?

 

I cannot think of damage in a pathway, neurologically seen, that implies other damage than damage done to neurons, which cannot regenerate properly. And, of course, dead neurons cannot do anything. I think it depends on the amount of neurons damaged whether the part would render dysfunctional and remain so over time.

 

So it may very well be that remaining neurons will make synaptic connections to other neurons after having lost their usual partner.

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So it may very well be that remaining neurons will make synaptic connections to other neurons after having lost their usual partner.

Yeah, that's a better way to put it

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There is limited potential for regeneration. However, there is some evidence that upon injury growth factors can, to some degree, stimulate neural progenitor cells.

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There is limited potential for regeneration. However, there is some evidence that upon injury growth factors can, to some degree, stimulate neural progenitor cells.

Right. Just looked them up:

 

 

Neural progenitors are cells that are capable of dividing a limited number of times and have the capacity to differentiate into a restricted repertoire of neuronal and glial cell types.

Is it known how the brain, or nervous system in general, 'remembers' how it needs to be to restore a damaged neural section? Or is it that progenitor cells just do what they do in response to some chemical signal and re-connections just happen?

Edited by StringJunky

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Brain cells are only formed once and they survive throughout the life.

In case of their death, they are not replaced.

So, beware to protect your brain !

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Brain cells are only formed once and they survive throughout the life.

In case of their death, they are not replaced.

So, beware to protect your brain !

I think there's some neuroplasticity.

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Right. Just looked them up:

 

Is it known how the brain, or nervous system in general, 'remembers' how it needs to be to restore a damaged neural section? Or is it that progenitor cells just do what they do in response to some chemical signal and re-connections just happen?

 

I am not an expert in this area but from what I understand it is a somewhat non-directed process. I.e. progenitor cells move to the area of lesion and start differentiating depending on the signal molecules present. I imagine it more of a patch that eventually can take over some of the lost functions but it is not a perfect rebuild of the initial state. I.e. you will see that the tissue is distinctly different from before the lesion.

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I am not an expert in this area but from what I understand it is a somewhat non-directed process. I.e. progenitor cells move to the area of lesion and start differentiating depending on the signal molecules present. I imagine it more of a patch that eventually can take over some of the lost functions but it is not a perfect rebuild of the initial state. I.e. you will see that the tissue is distinctly different from before the lesion.

Right. Thanks.

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An axon can regrow or be repaired if the cell body is still intact but only in the peripheral nervous system.

In the central nervous system (brain+spinal cord) axonregeneration is very unlikely.

I suppose only stem cells can regrow a cell body.

 

In the central nervous system (CNS) there is a chemical/physical bad environment for axonregeneration.

CNS neurons do not upregulate growth-associated genes to the same extent as do PNS neurons. Consequently, their ability to regenerate axons is limited even in the absence of the 'bad environment'.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2846285/

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An axon can regrow or be repaired if the cell body is still intact but only in the peripheral nervous system.

In the central nervous system (brain+spinal cord) axonregeneration is very unlikely.

I suppose only stem cells can regrow a cell body.

 

In the central nervous system (CNS) there is a chemical/physical bad environment for axonregeneration.

CNS neurons do not upregulate growth-associated genes to the same extent as do PNS neurons. Consequently, their ability to regenerate axons is limited even in the absence of the 'bad environment'.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2846285/

 

It might also be interesting, OP, to look up Wallers' degeneration

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Thanks for the replies everyone.

 

This discussion is very hopelessness inducing and depressing for me. I have suffered concussion plenty of times. I am 31 years old now too. So basically there is no way for me(my brain) to regrow/repair them?

 

Some stroke sufferers on the internet claim that they have made remarkable recovery by eating a healthy diet. Some say the paleo diet mixed with plenty of fresh, organic veggies and milk from grass-fed cows helps a lot. I know stroke and concussion are completely different things, but I wonder if us humans can induce neurogenesis simply by eating healthy?


There is limited potential for regeneration. However, there is some evidence that upon injury growth factors can, to some degree, stimulate neural progenitor cells.

 

Even in the cerebrum?

Edited by Omair

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!

Moderator Note

 

medical advice hidden. Please do not dispense advice.

 

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Thanks for the replies everyone.

 

This discussion is very hopelessness inducing and depressing for me.....

We are the wrong people to be asking. We discuss science, amongst other things, purely as an intellectual endeavour and we aren't equipped to dispense advice or even how to take your feelings into consideration when we express our knowledge and thoughts. You need someone conversant in head trauma to talk to you. If I were you, I would be looking for that kind of person.

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There is an increasing body of literature looking into the effects of concussion and strategies to help recovery. What I can say is that there are still a lot of open questions but degrees of recovery are possible, as plasticity is larger than expected. However, things you read in fora are going to be anecdotes where recovery may or may not be related to things someone did. What I would recommend is to go look for specialists that can help you with issues that you may have.

 

I have not found lit that indicates that a diet without further intervention would do anything, except perhaps being overall beneficial if you choose a healthy diet. Also there is evidence that e.g. alcohol consumption delays recovery, thought that is true for most injuries.

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I have been beaten up and bullied my entire life, as a result, I fear I have lost many neurons due to repeated head traumas.

 

I think there is a serious underlying issue here which merits further discussion. Can I respectfully ask the Mods to move this portion of the OP to the Lounge with the title: "What to do when being bullied?" which may appeal to the younger audience who may wish to contribute their thoughts and also give advice, Thanks

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