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Endy0816

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Posts posted by Endy0816

  1. 6 hours ago, Art Man said:

    I recommend that you do not eat Easy Cheez American cheese, I tried it yesterday and gagged on the taste of paint can flavor mixed with a hint of construction site stale sawdust flavor. Worst cheese experience of my life. It didn't taste like cheese and wasn't a dairy product in the least.

    If it comes out of a can I'd avoid it too.

    Slices are definitely tasty on burgers. I've always felt rest of the world got all the good cheeses though. Swiss and provolone are my go-to's.

  2. 13 hours ago, Deniz Sümer said:

    With the mirrors, I had an idea like this: A small image is bounced off using a set of distant small mirrors to create the illusion of a huge distance, then two concave lenses enlarge the image back to a big one (Image is enarged back by lenses to avoid using huge mirrors on every bounce).

    Would something like this work?

    projection distant.png

     

    I think resulting image of the picture would look much as you have here, albeit dimmer. Not sure that is what you are asking for though.

    To clarify are you wanting it to appear 3D?

  3. On 9/8/2019 at 6:56 PM, Deniz Sümer said:

    They look small and very distant rather than small and very close. Did you check the holosights?

    You'll probably want to look into binocular vision and depth perception. Without, you can hazard a guess from context, but if something is proportionally larger or smaller than expected you can have an issue.

     

    Easiest thing to increase the apparent distance would be a concave lens. Flat mirrors alone could work, but you would need to increase the distance the light has to travel. Could move mirrors apart or reflect the image multiple times.

    Barber-shop-commercial-design-full-size-wall-mirrors-with-polishing-supplied-and-installed-in-Northern-ireland.png.71dd5a5b04cc95a959f28e7e4548c8b7.png

  4. On 8/31/2019 at 7:39 PM, Curious layman said:

    Moon rock

    The Apollo missions brought back 2200 samples weighing 382 kilograms (842 lb). The Russians have brought back 301grams (10.6 oz) from three sample return missions.

    Also important to note, there have been more than 370 lunar meteorite finds, mainly in Antarctica, Northern Africa, and Oman, with a mass of over 190 kilograms (420 lb).

    I'm pretty sure the Queen was given some moon samples as a gift, about 3 grains or something.

    Yeah many would have been contaminated by our atmosphere but that should still leave a ton for this and future experiments.

  5. Pigeonholing(timezone, writing style, identifying information), social media links, IP address (from  something like an image download) and outright tricking someone to download malicious files. Only the last would really be hacking.

    It's generally not that hard if somebody's reasonably active or not cautious enough.

    So far it sounds like everything your friend is seeing is only circumstantial.  Could easily be a case of false pattern recognition.

  6. 3 hours ago, Danijel Gorupec said:

    Hmm "...for the first time in decades, NASA is about to open some of the pristine samples..."

    Is it possible that 'in decades' there was no single technological advancements worth it? I would be expecting that each time a technological progress is made, some amount of samples get unsealed and examined.

    I think I would be more generous toward scientists regarding sample quantities. First, samples can get destroyed or contaminated (accidentally or by an intentional attack). Second, I would expect new missions to bring new samples (I don't think NASA planned not to have a mission for 50 years).

    Anyway, it seems to me that waiting so long was sub-optimal. What do you think?

    They mention a smaller vault with returned samples that were previously loaned out.

    If memory serves they brought back and awful lot of material in total.

  7. 2 hours ago, Art Man said:

    And then there is the mouse wheel, which would accomplish what you want without tracks and rollers.

    Actually about what they had, though walking on the outside of the wheel.

    screenshot-25.jpg.3061951918090474c2433ad76f50a6c8.jpg

    They also had single man ones which were more a sideways wheel.

    2037302272_170px-En_Trdemoelle.gif.beb8925d20036ab77449d4bb2bc854c1.gif

    40 minutes ago, J.C.MacSwell said:

    I use a simple set up in the winter to heat my house; a stationary bike with frictional resistance.

    100 % efficient!

    (no, not thermodynamic efficiency)

     A very sound use :)

  8. 3 hours ago, Lizwi said:

    Thanks, does that mean the pressure at the bottom of any fluid is atmospheric pressure?

    No, there is an unseen outlet in this case. Honestly is a confusing way to draw/label things.

    Your original instinct would be correct in the case of a lake or body of water.

    Would need more information on the tank(vented or non-vented) and pressure at the top of it to say what exactly would happen next.

  9. 8 hours ago, Sensei said:

    It is to have work activity that you LOVE to do..

    Why people are quitting job ASAP after winning the lottery? Because they HATE their daily job..

    Recently there was thread about "purpose of life". If somebody would be immortal and having to do job he or she hates, for eternity, it would be like being in the hell for eternity..

    People doing their hated jobs dream of retiring. That is really sad life.

    Definitely important to have a job you like doing.

    I'm thinking people will still find ways to occupy their time but their work will be more meaningful or at least pleasant.

    Resources will still be finite, so some economic system will be required. Always some scarcity out there. Quite bit will likely be effectively free though.

  10. On 8/13/2019 at 3:01 PM, Adom said:

    Hi. I want to ask, why in anaerobic conditions piruvate is converting to lactate or alchol? Where oxygen is used in aerobic conditions? What it do? 

    Oxygen acts as an electron acceptor.

     

    "In biology, a terminal electron acceptor is a compound that receives or accepts an electron during cellular respiration or photosynthesis. All organisms obtain energy by transferring electrons from an electron donor to an electron acceptor. During this process (electron transport chain) the electron acceptor is reduced and the electron donor is oxidized."

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electron_acceptor

  11. Most of it has some role though not in coding for proteins. Even the DNA that has no functional role at all can still act as a repository of genetic material and buffer against negativly impacting mutations.

    Quote

    Noncoding DNA sequences are components of an organism's DNA that do not encode protein sequences. Some noncoding DNA is transcribed into functional non-coding RNA molecules (e.g. transfer RNA, ribosomal RNA, and regulatory RNAs). Other functions of noncoding DNA include the transcriptional and translational regulation of protein-coding sequences, scaffold attachment regions, origins of DNA replication, centromeres and telomeres.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Non-coding_DNA

    Pseudogenes are also noncoding but are related to functional genes.

    Imagine if:

    condition

    1 1 =

    start

    55 *567 * store

    stop

    was the functional gene and the pseudogene was:

    condition

    1 1 =

    start

    55

    stop

    *567

    start

    store

    stop

    still recognizable but no longer  functions in the way it once did.

     

  12. 13 hours ago, MaximT said:

        I imagined a huge net of copper wires or optic fiber, depending on ratio cost/bandwidth you want to achieved, place at the bottom of the sea. At every kilometer of wire, there will be a wire that goes upward with a communication device on it. When the submarine, or the aircraft carrier or other, want a secure and very fast connexion, they send a probe with a wire, to the bottom of the sea, to get a connexion with the nodal network.

        So, I don't know what are the odd: could I develop such a system, in the interest of Human kind?

     

    You can raise masts and antennas above the surface and remain submerged. VLF and the underwater telephone are also options used today.

    I don't know for sure on this, but there could be transmitters attached to undersea cables acting as relays, in areas where  submarines armed with nuclear weapons frequent. Be a fairly logical fallback option.

    I don't think it is necessarily a bad idea in general but between resources required, alternatives, and typical missions I don't think it'll see much traction.

  13. Lowers the pressure in the room(assuming room is reasonably sealed). Loading up with heat the air that is leaving.

    They are less efficient like you say. Better not to cause a leak in the first place than to have to pump fast enough to stay ahead of it. Dual hose or a proper Window unit are better options.

  14. 1 hour ago, raphillips67 said:

    I have called three laboratories this week, one has already responded they can do such testing and what the fee would be. ($780). I intend to peruse this avenue. 

    That would only prove they had it on them, not that she sprayed them.

    Please look into cameras and consider mundane explanations. You and Phymatotrichopsis omnivora enjoy the milder winters. It causing rapid wilting and death might easily be mistaken for Roundup at first glance.

    Honestly I would probably just stop planting hibiscus there and a call it day.

  15. We know people who lack the ability to feel pain. Doesn't really help them any though, as it leads to continually injuring themselves.

    Would be nice if the pain from long term untreatable damage could be blocked or in cases where there's an issue in the nervous system.

  16. 1 hour ago, Moreno said:

    How can we exploit the ground?

    Can the "displacement currents" in air or ground be ever useful to transmit data or energy? What if we use the resonant frequency of air molecules? To cause polarization waves of air molecules?

    Can some quantum mechanics be useful for data transmission? For example, can we create some kind of "quantum coupling" between two antennas?

    VLF and ULF waves can travel below ground. Electrical current can also return through the ground(single wire telegraph systems).

    Not sure about your second question.

    QM requires a second standard transmission channel.

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