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ender7x77

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Everything posted by ender7x77

  1. oh ya when i said the volume was 1.5m cubed, i didn't mean to the exponent and i am sorry for the confusion...the same thing for the cost of the wood. anyways plz help i am totally lost
  2. K i got this application question the other day in my introduction to calculus class and i was wondering if anyone could lend me a hand. Katie is building a wooden rectangular storage box. The box will have an open top and a volume of 1.5m cubed. For design purposes, Katie would like the length of its base to be triple its width. Thick wood for the base costs $8/m squared and thinner wood for the sides costs $5/m squared. a) Express the cost of the wood as a finction of the width of the base. b) Find all possible dimensions if Katie spends $44 for the wood. c) what dimensions would you recommend? Why? Now, i think if someone could help me with a) then i probably would be able to get the rest. I have figured out the base of the box is 3w + w, where w represents the the width size, but given that i do not know how to get the height of the box. I believe if i can determine the w variable then i could find the height by manipulating the formula for the volume of a box (V= lwh). anyways any help would be greatly appreciated..
  3. I was wondering if anyone knew some natural buffers found in the soil of Georgian Bay protecting the region from acid precipitation? I'm having a hard time researching this and i was wondering if anyone could help me out. It doesn't have to be detailed (unless you feel compelled to), if you could simply just name some that would be sufficient for me, i can then research it and make the connections. thanks
  4. Thank you for enlightening me and helping me solve my problem
  5. I'm kind of new here and not the greatest biologist (i think this applies in this forum) and was wondering if users could possibly help me out with something that has been baffling me. The other day my biology teacher for my Grade 12 Academic class showed us a little experiment involving homogenized milk, food colouring, and detergent. I'm aware that the milk is mostly comprised of water and contains some fats, that food colouring is water soluble, and that the detergent is an emulsfying agent (not quite sure what emulsion is), but that is were my knowledge ends. The experiment went like this: We took a petri dish and half filled it with the homogenized milk and let it sit for like two minutes. After it was left to sit, we took four different colours of food colouring and placed them in four different corners for each colour. Once that was done we took a single tooth pick and placed the end in some detergent and then took that end put it in the centre of the petri dish. This caused the food colouring to spontaneously disperse quickly to the edge of the corners and then disappear into the milk. A few minutes later the colours remerged and dispersed once again but slowly in a way that looked like a tie dye commericialswhere different streams of colours moved and swirled. Well, i made up a hyothesis after conducting some research on the emulsion, which i am unsure about, and this is what i believe occured. Since the detergent is a natural emulsifying agent it is suffice to say that as soon as it is in contact with the homogenized milk, it reacts instantaneously to its fat contents. This reaction is emulsion and causes colloid suspension. Surface tension caused by the addition of the detergent forces the food colour to disappear in the uniform white which is the milk. Since the food colouring is insoluble in the water makeup of the homogenized milk does not dissolve in it. This allows the colours to re-emerge completely as they were and stream across the petri dish If anyone can add/explain why these things happen it would be greatly appreciated because i want to impress my teacher and dont avoid sounding condescending because the simpliest anwser is good too. Thanks. PS- if you happen to know the properties of those 3 things (milk, food colouring, detergent
  6. I'm kind of new here and not the greatest biologist (i think this applies in this forum) and was wondering if users could possibly help me out with something that has been baffling me. The other day my biology teacher for my Grade 12 Academic class showed us a little experiment involving homogenized milk, food colouring, and detergent. I'm aware that the milk is mostly comprised of water and contains some fats, that food colouring is water soluble, and that the detergent is an emulsfying agent (not quite sure what emulsion is), but that is were my knowledge ends. The experiment went like this: We took a petri dish and half filled it with the homogenized milk and let it sit for like two minutes. After it was left to sit, we took four different colours of food colouring and placed them in four different corners for each colour. Once that was done we took a single tooth pick and placed the end in some detergent and then took that end put it in the centre of the petri dish. This caused the food colouring to spontaneously disperse quickly to the edge of the corners and then disappear into the milk. A few minutes later the colours remerged and dispersed once again but slowly in a way that looked like a tie dye commericialswhere different streams of colours moved and swirled. If anyone can explain why these things happen it would be greatly appreciated because i want to impress my teacher and dont avoid sounding condescending because the simpliest anwser is good too. Thanks. PS- if you happen to know the properties of those 3 things (milk, food colouring, detergent) please do enlighten me
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