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John Cuthber

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Posts posted by John Cuthber


  1. 7 minutes ago, BraveDoNut said:

    if you'll learn stupid fake stuff in school is that your thing.... but I don't want that!

    Then why are you posting it here?

     

    8 minutes ago, BraveDoNut said:

    a proof is a proof,

    And you don't have one.


  2. 2 hours ago, Enthalpy said:

    Everything I wrote is confirmed

    So who wrote this?
     

    6 hours ago, Enthalpy said:

    If 0.3t cyanide had been injected in the atmosphere of a dense city, more people would worry about it.

     

    2 hours ago, Enthalpy said:

    Lead oxide doesn't dilute in the atmosphere. It falls down.

    Delighted to hear it. I know Parisians can be a bit odd, but eating from the floor isn't common there.


  3. 2 hours ago, Enthalpy said:

    If 0.3t cyanide had been injected in the atmosphere of a dense city, more people would worry about it.

    The population of Paris is about 2 million

    And, if they are typical French people, they smoke an average of about 1100 cigarettes per year.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_cigarette_consumption_per_capita

    So that's roughly two billion cigarettes per year.

    Each cig is about 0.65 g

    So that's a total of 1250 tonnes of tobacco.
    And, according to this
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4518591/

    the yield of cyanide is about 500 micrograms per gram i.e. about 1 in 2000 of the mass.

    So that gives very roughly 0.6 tonnes of cyanide released in Paris each year just from cigarettes- there are, of course, other sources too.

    "we estimate that 654 tonnes of HCN were emitted in 2012 from LDV in Canada, including ~252 tonnes in Ontario."

    from
    https://core.ac.uk/download/pdf/82009669.pdf

    How worried are people?
    Well, not very worried, because the atmosphere is big.

    On a related note, how much of the timber had been treated with copper chrome arsenate?

    What's the yield of benzo alpha pyrene from timber in fires?

     


  4. 4 hours ago, Dan9191 said:

    voice to skull using microwaves,scalar waves and ultrasonic

    That is not an answer to the question " why?" it's an answer to the question "how?".
    And nobody asked that.

    However, the important advice here is; see a doctor.


  5. On a tangentially related note.  (and I accept, it's a serious "tangent"), if I was minded to repeat Cavendish's experiment on weighing the Earth, What would be the best material from which to make the suspension wire?


  6. Lead is hardly the only possible contaminant which would have people wearing masks etc.

    Have we ruled out asbestos, for example?
     

    6 hours ago, Enthalpy said:

    Many people told quickly "yellow smoke is lead, toxic, decontaminate"

    By whom?


  7. Could a combination of materials do for a piano frame what this does for the pendulum of a clock?
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gridiron_pendulum

    Even better, could it change the length of the frame in such a way as to compensate for changes in both the length and the tension of the strings?

    That way, temperature wouldn't affect the tuning.

    The old joke about "it was in tune when I bought it" might become a thing of the past.


     


  8. 15 minutes ago, AUDI R6 said:

    This shows how stupid Paul Dirac and all those who continued his work.

    LOL

    If, in spite of the rules, you are going to call people stupid, at least get the grammar right.

    16 minutes ago, AUDI R6 said:

    Well  I dont understand...

    A lot of things, including the use of apostrophes.


  9. Practically no crystals are prefect.

     

    Proteins, and even entire viruses can form pretty good crystals.

    https://www.jstor.org/stable/231608?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents

     

    So the opening post makes no sense.

    It's like saying " how come we can't build brick walls/"

    Andyet, rather than saying - "we can build them", people don't bother to check.

    They draw up elaborate explanations for things that are not actually true.

    Hence my questions

    Why do people insist on trying to explain things that don't actually happen ?

    Why do people insist on trying to explain why things that do happen, can't happen?

     

     

     

     


  10. On 6/15/2019 at 10:26 PM, nec209 said:
    • doctors and surgeons
    • nurses
    • dentist
    • construction workers
    • maintenance workers
    • office workers
    • factory workers
    • electrician
    • plumper
    • engineer of all types of fields buildings, bridges, electrical so on
    • water and road workers
    • drug companies
    • people skilled in biology
    • people skinned in chemistry
    • people skilled in physics
    • people skilled in computers and technology
    • teachers
    • professors
    • cop
    • firefighter
    • EMT
    • court system
    • government system
    • transportation system on land and air
    • stores and shops every where
    • goods and supplies
    • other skilled people and blue collar workers
    • office workers
    • factory workers
    • industry
    • Engineering supplies and Medical supplies
    • farmers

    This reminds me of the old joke about the boy who says he can't go to school because he's too busy.

    You know the one...

    There are 356 days in the year. But 104 of them are at weekends and there's no school then

    That leaves 365- 104 i.e. 252 days

    And I'm asleep for 8 hrs a day so that's a third of the time which is another 122 days.

    That only leaves 130 days.

    And so on...

    It adds up to an unreasonable total.

    And the reason it's silly is that he's double counting. It doesn't take account of the fact that you sleep at weekends etc.

     

    And the OP here is so enthusiastic about his point that he's overlooked all the double counting.

    For a start he's got factory workers and office workers on the list twice. (items 6,7 and 28,29 if I counted right)

    And then there's the fact that "office workers" and "factory workers" are typically in one or more of tehotehr groups.

    e.g.maintenance workers, other skilled people and blue collar workers, maintenance workers and so on are likely to be factory workers.

     

     


  11. On 6/15/2019 at 10:26 PM, nec209 said:
    • doctors and surgeons
    • nurses
    • dentist
    • construction workers
    • maintenance workers
    • office workers
    • factory workers
    • electrician
    • plumper
    • engineer of all types of fields buildings, bridges, electrical so on
    • water and road workers
    • drug companies
    • people skilled in biology
    • people skinned in chemistry
    • people skilled in physics
    • people skilled in computers and technology
    • teachers
    • professors
    • cop
    • firefighter
    • EMT
    • court system
    • government system
    • transportation system on land and air
    • stores and shops every where
    • goods and supplies
    • other skilled people and blue collar workers
    • office workers
    • factory workers
    • industry
    • Engineering supplies and Medical supplies
    • farmers

    This reminds me of the old joke about the boy who says he can't go to school because he's too busy.

    You know the one...

    There are 356 days in the year.

    That leaves 


  12. 17 minutes ago, Sensei said:

    Not once, I saw in firewall that Skype was taking significant amount of bandwidth, without me sending or receiving any data through it.

    The use of "not once" is unhelpfully ambiguous.

    Do you mean zero times- which is "not once" or do you mean many times which of course is also "not once"?


  13. 1 hour ago, Strange said:

    The problem is you are confusing the name (A) with the thing it refers to.

    Have we ruled out trolling as the cause of the problem?

    Anyway, it seems that nearly everything can change- everything except Farid's mind.


  14. 14 hours ago, Carrock said:

    I attempted to concentrate on the thing I felt sure was correct, the inability of a Faraday cage to prevent an applied D.C. voltage from appearing on its inner conductive surfaces.

    If you are inside a conductor- like your power line workers- the pattern of voltages in the outside world can do as it pleases. None of them will affect you. They may induce currents in the suit when they change.

    In particular, no DC arrangement of potentials fields, or voltages outside the conductor will affect you if you are inside it.

    That's the sense in which a Faraday cage works just fine for DC and the sense in which the thing you're sure of is wrong.
    You were simply mistaken. It would have been better if you had asked for help, but you went off on some daft tangent  about 

    On 7/10/2019 at 7:53 PM, Carrock said:

    No.

    In the spirit of this site, do not provide the correct answer.



    Now, what was that about rhetoric?


  15. 11 hours ago, J.C.MacSwell said:

    ...and untrue of GR for the last 50+ years unless you invoke unproven dark matter ad hoc

    You or anyone else guessing doesn't change that.

    No. At that time (as I stated... prior to 1859) it was not.

    As I stated your statements may seem reasonable...

    We don't know that they are true.

    OK, fair point.

    I should have read it more carefully.

    However there's still a difference.

    An army of people have been trying very hard to find problems with GR- and they have not. (Not yet, if you insist)

    They have made measurements to lots of significant figures and GR seems to work.


    So, to the best of our (current) knowledge, GR gives the right answer.

    So, (to the best of our current understanding )anything that disagrees with GR by more than the tiny experimental uncertainty is wrong.
     

    So either those early papers agree, or they disagree by some tiny discrepancy, or they are wrong.

    In which case the answer to the OP's question is "they are subsumed (if they are right) or superseded (if they are wrong) or the difference is so small that we can't measure it"

     

     

     


  16. 10 hours ago, Midnighthypothesis said:

    intelligent people are more likely to use drugs, specifically cannabis and stimulants.

    Cannabis is not typically considered a stimulant- rather the reverse.

    So, if your assertion is correct (and others have already questioned that) it suggests that bright people seek downers as much as uppers, so it's not necessarily stimulation they seek.

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