John Cuthber

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Posts posted by John Cuthber


  1. Practically no crystals are prefect.

     

    Proteins, and even entire viruses can form pretty good crystals.

    https://www.jstor.org/stable/231608?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents

     

    So the opening post makes no sense.

    It's like saying " how come we can't build brick walls/"

    Andyet, rather than saying - "we can build them", people don't bother to check.

    They draw up elaborate explanations for things that are not actually true.

    Hence my questions

    Why do people insist on trying to explain things that don't actually happen ?

    Why do people insist on trying to explain why things that do happen, can't happen?

     

     

     

     


  2. On 6/15/2019 at 10:26 PM, nec209 said:
    • doctors and surgeons
    • nurses
    • dentist
    • construction workers
    • maintenance workers
    • office workers
    • factory workers
    • electrician
    • plumper
    • engineer of all types of fields buildings, bridges, electrical so on
    • water and road workers
    • drug companies
    • people skilled in biology
    • people skinned in chemistry
    • people skilled in physics
    • people skilled in computers and technology
    • teachers
    • professors
    • cop
    • firefighter
    • EMT
    • court system
    • government system
    • transportation system on land and air
    • stores and shops every where
    • goods and supplies
    • other skilled people and blue collar workers
    • office workers
    • factory workers
    • industry
    • Engineering supplies and Medical supplies
    • farmers

    This reminds me of the old joke about the boy who says he can't go to school because he's too busy.

    You know the one...

    There are 356 days in the year. But 104 of them are at weekends and there's no school then

    That leaves 365- 104 i.e. 252 days

    And I'm asleep for 8 hrs a day so that's a third of the time which is another 122 days.

    That only leaves 130 days.

    And so on...

    It adds up to an unreasonable total.

    And the reason it's silly is that he's double counting. It doesn't take account of the fact that you sleep at weekends etc.

     

    And the OP here is so enthusiastic about his point that he's overlooked all the double counting.

    For a start he's got factory workers and office workers on the list twice. (items 6,7 and 28,29 if I counted right)

    And then there's the fact that "office workers" and "factory workers" are typically in one or more of tehotehr groups.

    e.g.maintenance workers, other skilled people and blue collar workers, maintenance workers and so on are likely to be factory workers.

     

     


  3. On 6/15/2019 at 10:26 PM, nec209 said:
    • doctors and surgeons
    • nurses
    • dentist
    • construction workers
    • maintenance workers
    • office workers
    • factory workers
    • electrician
    • plumper
    • engineer of all types of fields buildings, bridges, electrical so on
    • water and road workers
    • drug companies
    • people skilled in biology
    • people skinned in chemistry
    • people skilled in physics
    • people skilled in computers and technology
    • teachers
    • professors
    • cop
    • firefighter
    • EMT
    • court system
    • government system
    • transportation system on land and air
    • stores and shops every where
    • goods and supplies
    • other skilled people and blue collar workers
    • office workers
    • factory workers
    • industry
    • Engineering supplies and Medical supplies
    • farmers

    This reminds me of the old joke about the boy who says he can't go to school because he's too busy.

    You know the one...

    There are 356 days in the year.

    That leaves 


  4. 17 minutes ago, Sensei said:

    Not once, I saw in firewall that Skype was taking significant amount of bandwidth, without me sending or receiving any data through it.

    The use of "not once" is unhelpfully ambiguous.

    Do you mean zero times- which is "not once" or do you mean many times which of course is also "not once"?


  5. 1 hour ago, Strange said:

    The problem is you are confusing the name (A) with the thing it refers to.

    Have we ruled out trolling as the cause of the problem?

    Anyway, it seems that nearly everything can change- everything except Farid's mind.


  6. 14 hours ago, Carrock said:

    I attempted to concentrate on the thing I felt sure was correct, the inability of a Faraday cage to prevent an applied D.C. voltage from appearing on its inner conductive surfaces.

    If you are inside a conductor- like your power line workers- the pattern of voltages in the outside world can do as it pleases. None of them will affect you. They may induce currents in the suit when they change.

    In particular, no DC arrangement of potentials fields, or voltages outside the conductor will affect you if you are inside it.

    That's the sense in which a Faraday cage works just fine for DC and the sense in which the thing you're sure of is wrong.
    You were simply mistaken. It would have been better if you had asked for help, but you went off on some daft tangent  about 

    On 7/10/2019 at 7:53 PM, Carrock said:

    No.

    In the spirit of this site, do not provide the correct answer.



    Now, what was that about rhetoric?


  7. 11 hours ago, J.C.MacSwell said:

    ...and untrue of GR for the last 50+ years unless you invoke unproven dark matter ad hoc

    You or anyone else guessing doesn't change that.

    No. At that time (as I stated... prior to 1859) it was not.

    As I stated your statements may seem reasonable...

    We don't know that they are true.

    OK, fair point.

    I should have read it more carefully.

    However there's still a difference.

    An army of people have been trying very hard to find problems with GR- and they have not. (Not yet, if you insist)

    They have made measurements to lots of significant figures and GR seems to work.


    So, to the best of our (current) knowledge, GR gives the right answer.

    So, (to the best of our current understanding )anything that disagrees with GR by more than the tiny experimental uncertainty is wrong.
     

    So either those early papers agree, or they disagree by some tiny discrepancy, or they are wrong.

    In which case the answer to the OP's question is "they are subsumed (if they are right) or superseded (if they are wrong) or the difference is so small that we can't measure it"

     

     

     


  8. 10 hours ago, Midnighthypothesis said:

    intelligent people are more likely to use drugs, specifically cannabis and stimulants.

    Cannabis is not typically considered a stimulant- rather the reverse.

    So, if your assertion is correct (and others have already questioned that) it suggests that bright people seek downers as much as uppers, so it's not necessarily stimulation they seek.


  9. No.

    If I posted something like 

    11 hours ago, John Cuthber said:

    a Faraday cage only blocks changing fields

    I'd still be criticised for being wrong.

     

    20 hours ago, Carrock said:

    No.

    Does wiki say this

    a Faraday cage blocks changing fields, and constant voltage

    ?

    No.

    I'm not familiar with the concept of blocking/not blocking constant voltage in a conductor. I can live without this knowledge.

     

    Does wiki say this?

    Yes.

     

     

    Fun/scary video. You can see the arcing at about 16s as the linesmen connect themselves and the helicopter to the live high voltage line.

    As the linesmen are wearing Faraday cages and the frequency (60Hz) is too low for conditions inside the cages to differ much from D.C., I presume you claim the voltage inside their cages is pretty near zero.

    Ask one of them to drop an insulated wire from inside her cage to you on the ground. Good luck persuading her.

    Linesmen are so conservative and overcautious that not one living linesman has ever tried this experiment.

     

    Three posts in this thread and you've provided no useful information. Why bother?

    OK, here is some information that may be useful to people working in conductive suits on high voltage systems.

    Make sure that any holes in the suit are small.

    The exact definition of "small" depends on context.

    In the particular case of a hole with a wire running through it the value tends to zero.

    Because, in the case of a "faraday cage" with a wire leading through a hole in it, you don't have a faraday cage.

     

     

     

     


  10. 3 hours ago, J.C.MacSwell said:

    Both of these statements seem reasonable...but could have been stated just as reasonably about Newtonian gravity at one time.

    At that time, the precession of Mercury would mean that the important first statement in the set

    "We know that GR has passed every test that it has ever been subject to."

    was untrue of Newtonian physics.


    And you seem to have missed the significance of my last conjecture.

    On 7/7/2019 at 9:32 AM, John Cuthber said:

    My guess is that it is equivalent (give or take some transform) to GR.


     


  11. 18 minutes ago, zapatos said:

    Your continued misuse of the English language is another factor making it difficult to have meaningful discussions with you.  

    To be fair, I strongly suspect that English is not Farid's first language.


  12. 5 hours ago, BillNye123 said:

    Safe to say, one reason that these papers aren't talked about more is their incompatibility with General Relativity.

    We know that GR has passed every test that it has ever been subject to.

    If Whittaker's work doesn't agree with GR then it also doesn't agree with experimental observation.

    And if that's the case then there's a much better underlying reason to ignore it than some supposed "Einsteinian mafia".
    If it disagrees with GR then it's wrong.

    My guess is that it is equivalent (give or take some transform) to GR.