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Carl Fredrik Ahl

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Posts posted by Carl Fredrik Ahl


  1. Hi,

    I can't find much information about concentrated hydrochloric acid and the uses for it. I find much information about regular hydrochloric acid, for exemaple that it is used to regulare pH in stuff and are additives in food. Can you plz give me some examples of what concentrated hydrochloric acid is used for and how it differs from regular hydrochloric acid.


  2. Hi,

    I have read (on multiple places, including watching YouTube) that your body can't consume more than about 30-35 grams of protein per meal (or protein shake). I wonder how long it takes for it to restart and the body can absorb that amount again (how many minutes or hours?). I also wonder what determines when you consume more than the body can handle per meal (or protein shake) if the protein gets converted to fat or just go in the toilet. I have heard that both of this happens.


  3. Hi, 

    I wonder if it's true that it's better to have your heart rate at about 70% of your max heart rate to burn fat?(https://www.healthline.com/health/fitness-exercise/fat-burning-heart-rate; )

    I have heard that if you workout at your maximum heart rate the body will use stored glucose in your muscles (collagen) which can be bad if you want to build muscle. I don't care specifically about burning fat, just burn calories so less calories will be stored as fat, but I don't want stored glucose in my muscles to be used as the energy. 


  4. Hi,

    I have a question about opioids. When you are running for a long period of time the body produces endorphines. Here is a quote from a webiste (https://guenergy.com/blogs/nutrition-lab/runner-s-high-is-it-really-all-endorphins: "Scientists found that running for prolonged periods increased levels of β-endorphins in the body’s circulation. This increase was correlated with increased reports of positive mood changes. The correlation led researchers to conclude that β-endorphins produce the runner’s high." The website says that beta-endorphines is increased in the body. This webiste (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8780) says that beta-endorphines are 18-33 more potent than morphine. That would mean that it is also much more potent than heroin? Could that really be right? You couldn't get more high on running than if you took heroin, right? So what do they mean when they say that beta-endophines can be 18-33 times more potent than morphine?


  5. On 2/2/2020 at 4:00 AM, Huckleberry of Yore said:

    I understand that.  The brain turns circuits off so we don't physically react to dream scenes.  The usual scenario though is that I'm trying to wake up but my dream state convinces me there is a threat in my room (intruder) and I can't turn the circuits back on, so panic sets in.  And I have definitely experienced dreaming that I woke up only to realize that I was still dreaming.  My dad had the same experiences, I don't think it's uncommon.

    How do you get those sleep paralysis? Do you just go to sleep normaly and that happens sometimes by itself?

    On 2/2/2020 at 5:23 AM, Endy0816 said:

    Not totally off. No guarantees, but if you can focus on wiggling your fingertips, toes and deliberately moving your eyes; you may regain your sense of control.

    Last time I found the sleep paralysis to be oddly peaceful once I knew what was happening.

    It isn't definitely isn't uncommon. Wiki has a good page on it: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleep_paralysis

    How did you get sleep paralysis last time? Did you try or did it happen by itself?


  6. 17 hours ago, nevim said:

    You could search ‘lucid dreaming music’ on YouTube. There’s loads there. Might help you have some more. Best to wear earbuds although I find it doesn’t matter.

    That's a good idea. I have never tried that before. Thx for the answer.

    16 hours ago, Prometheus said:

    You could try setting an alarm clock to coincide with the REM part of your sleep cycle (there are apps that can roughly track the sleep cycle, not sure how accurate they are, otherwise just estimate and use trial and error). You don't want it so intrusive that it wakes you up, but you need to be able to hear it in dream: perhaps a favourite piece of music that invokes the kind of experience you are seeking. Avoid listening to it in the day: you want the sound to be a trigger let you know you're dreaming.

    That's a good idea. I have a watch that can track my sleep. I might try that. Thx for the answer.


  7. 19 hours ago, dimreepr said:

    how do you recognise reality?

    I had just watched a movie about lucid dreaming and told my self the day before "I'm going to be lucid in my next dream". I still tell myself that (MILD technique), but it haven't worked since that. I have to do reality checks now instead and I tell my self now "I'm going to to a reality check in my next dream" everyday instead.


  8. 21 minutes ago, dimreepr said:

    My experience is much more a recognition that I'm dreaming and how I can relax and enjoy the dream, sometimes I can control it but why would I want to.

    The first time that I had lucid dreams, I also just recognized that I was dreaming. So you don't do any reality checks? How often are you lucid and what technique do you use, or does it just happen to you without you trying?


  9. 1 hour ago, Bufofrog said:

    That's the point, if you feel the need to test if it's a dream then it's a dream, no further test required.  I have experienced lucid dreaming, I think that is sufficient knowledge on the subject.  You haven't discussed neuroscience that I have seen.

    Thx for the answer , but I don't understand.

    You are right, I didn't discuss anything about neuroscience. I shouldn't have said that, I just wanted to make clear that this is a complicated topic that require knowledge about how dreams works, which have to do with neuroscience and the unconscious mind. 

    46 minutes ago, Prometheus said:

    Do something you'd enjoy, go for a fly or something. Pushing your finger through your palm sounds boring anyway. Don't try to force things.

    May i ask why you feel need to test at all. Do you find yourself asking those questions when you are awake? Questioning reality can be a bad habit to practice, especially for people at risk of dissociation type mental health disorders.

    Well, to do those things you have to know that you are dreaming, hence doing the reality checks. Just watch some lucid dreamers on YouTube and EVERYONE will recommend doing reality checks. Some of them even say you should do it as often as 25-30 (or even more) times a day. I do it about 15 times a day. 

    I have tried flying in one of my lucid dreams, it was really fun :)

    33 minutes ago, Strange said:

    You should have a large amount of control in a lucid dream. So if your tests don't work it is because you don't want them to.

    Yeah you have a large amount of control when you are lucid, because you know that it is a dream and you can do almost what ever you want to do. What do you mean I don't want my tests to work? Why would I otherwise start this topic in the first place? Do you mean that I unconsciously don't want them to work? If so, in what way could that be?

    29 minutes ago, Carrock said:

    You could try looking at a bright light bulb. In a lucid dream it always looks dim to me. I suspect it's because I can't create the physiological effects of a bright light.

    That's a good idea, thank you. I will try that. So I could use the flashlight on my phone for instance? 


  10. 47 minutes ago, Strange said:

     

    If you are not certain that you are dreaming, then it is not a lucid dream. Can you control the dream - what happens next or rerun bits with different outcomes, etc? If so then (a) it is a lucid dream and (b) it is obvious you are dreaming (because you can't do those things in reality).

    First sentence from the description in Wikipedia:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lucid_dream

    I know what a lucid dream is. What I wonder is how and why my reality checks won't work which would otherwise acknowledge me that I'm dreaming so that it would be a lucid dream.


  11. 24 minutes ago, Strange said:

    What is a "reality check"? Is this an attempt to tell if you are awake or dreaming?

    Isn't it obvious that you are dreaming? It's not like reality, is it.

    Yes, it is to know if you're dreaming or not.

    No, lucid dreaming feels just like, or very much like reality. The part in the brain responsible for logical thinking doesn't work so good often while dreaming.

    19 minutes ago, Bufofrog said:

    If you ask yourself, "Is this a dream?" , then it is a dream, reality check complete.  I doubt any sane person mistakes reality for a dream.

    It's not that simple. 

    It's not about mistaken reality for a dream, it's the reverse. Plz learn more about the subject before answering. This topic is about neuroscience as well.


  12. Hi,

    I started lucid dreaming a few months ago. I got my first 3 lucid dreams on 1 night without using reality checks, but then I started to do it. The first time I tried it I tried to push my finger through my palm in my dream, which DIDN'T work, right after that I pinched my nose and tried to breathe, which DID work so I became lucid. 

    This month I have done 5 reality checks in total in my dreams and it didn't work anytime :(. 

    When I'm awake and do my reality checks I do it in this order: Looking around and see if I can see anything unusual. Looking at the time 3 times and see if it changes. Try to do telekinesis. Pinch my nose and try to breathe 3 times. I always expect that I'm going to be able to breathe.  Then I think about what I have done today, what I'm doing right now and what I will do later. In my dreams, the only thing I will do is pinch my nose and try to breathe which don't work now for some reason. I don't do the other things and I don't know why.

    What could I do to make my reality checks work? Should I do my reality checks in another way, or do something additional? Am I doing anything wrong?

     


  13. On 1/10/2020 at 2:57 PM, Dagl1 said:

    Probably going to be quite difficult to find individual genes, although you could take a look at GWAS studies regarding basal energy expenditure. GWAS studies are a way of correlating genes to specific traits, as in cases such as metabolic rate/energy expenditure, the trait is too complex to have a single or a few genes which are important. Additionally it could be that variant X of  gene1 increases energy expenditure in people with variant Y of gene2 but decreases expenditure in people with variant Z of gene2. This is probably less likely to happen than compounding effects, but since cellular networks are highly dynamic/complex, it is likely that it happens sometimes and it makes it a lot more difficult to search for specific genes/mutations that affect a complex/emergent trait.

    I did quick search and found some articles, but I haven't checked them for relevancy (only their titles appear relevant at the moment). I hope this helps or at least gets you started in your literature search (if you can't open an article, remember that sci-hub exists (although check whether or not you want to acquire your PDF there (legality/piracy reasons)), or send the authors an email, they will most likely send you their paper for free if you ask.

    Kind regards,
    Dagl

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5381071/pdf/40608_2017_Article_145.pdf
    DOI 10.1186/s40608-017-0145-5

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6072034/pdf/pone.0201555.pdf
    https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0201555

    http://apjcn.nhri.org.tw/server/APJCN/28/1/35.pdf
    doi: 10.6133/apjcn.201903_28(1).0006

    https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/medicine-and-dentistry/resting-energy-expenditure

    https://e-nrp.org/DOIx.php?id=10.4162/nrp.2016.10.1.115
    https://doi.org/10.4162/nrp.2016.10.1.115

    https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/10408399309527631
    https://doi.org/10.1080/10408399309527631

    These articles are to complex for me to understand, could you plz explain a bit on a more basic level how one can have higher resting metabolic rate than someone else that have the same mass, etc. How does one inherit metabolic rate? What common genes are involved that affect this?


  14. On 1/10/2020 at 2:57 PM, Dagl1 said:

    Probably going to be quite difficult to find individual genes, although you could take a look at GWAS studies regarding basal energy expenditure. GWAS studies are a way of correlating genes to specific traits, as in cases such as metabolic rate/energy expenditure, the trait is too complex to have a single or a few genes which are important. Additionally it could be that variant X of  gene1 increases energy expenditure in people with variant Y of gene2 but decreases expenditure in people with variant Z of gene2. This is probably less likely to happen than compounding effects, but since cellular networks are highly dynamic/complex, it is likely that it happens sometimes and it makes it a lot more difficult to search for specific genes/mutations that affect a complex/emergent trait.

    I did quick search and found some articles, but I haven't checked them for relevancy (only their titles appear relevant at the moment). I hope this helps or at least gets you started in your literature search (if you can't open an article, remember that sci-hub exists (although check whether or not you want to acquire your PDF there (legality/piracy reasons)), or send the authors an email, they will most likely send you their paper for free if you ask.

    Kind regards,
    Dagl

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5381071/pdf/40608_2017_Article_145.pdf
    DOI 10.1186/s40608-017-0145-5

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6072034/pdf/pone.0201555.pdf
    https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0201555

    http://apjcn.nhri.org.tw/server/APJCN/28/1/35.pdf
    doi: 10.6133/apjcn.201903_28(1).0006

    https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/medicine-and-dentistry/resting-energy-expenditure

    https://e-nrp.org/DOIx.php?id=10.4162/nrp.2016.10.1.115
    https://doi.org/10.4162/nrp.2016.10.1.115

    https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/10408399309527631
    https://doi.org/10.1080/10408399309527631

    Thank you:)

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