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Outrider

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Everything posted by Outrider

  1. Hi DrKrettin Your comments are unfair because they imply that the experiment was easy to do. Per the linked article the hydrogen was subjected to 5 million earth atmospheres and minus 270c temperatures. I think the onus is on you to show us why it was easy and should have been accomplished "ages" ago. OTOH the article also quotes several scientists questioning the validity of the experiment so don't get to excited just yet. As Luis already pointed out i am sure an attempt to replicate is already in the works. If confirmed this will be exciting news indeed.
  2. Oh thanks Phil just what I was looking for. The article mentions that as they refine their techniques they should be able to estimate the mass of the moon. Here's hoping they find a binary earth system.
  3. And it's still not revelant to what I posted or the link I gave.I was not implying that life could not originate on a moonless planet but rather the stable seasons we enjoy on earth are condusive to life as we know it and also IMO more important than the tide, much more.
  4. Yeah as others have said I think they go hand in hand.All the imagination and creativity in the world ain't worth 2 cents if you can't express it. What has the scientific method given us? A million and one ways to do just that(express ourselves).
  5. All right my first question and first thread all in one. I'm excited and hope you are too. After doing a search I see that no exoplanet moons have been confirmed but my question is could the mass of some planets be overestimated because it has one or more large moons. I assume if our earth is being detected by alien astronomers by the same techniques we use the extra mass of our moon wouldn't really matter all that much. But is it possible for two earth sized bodies to have a stable and close orbit or an earth sized body with several large moons. Could this account for at least some of the superearths?
  6. Hello Ophiolite I read your comment a couple of times and still can't keen the relevance to my post. I was responding to Strange's reply to this: I was not implying that life could not originate on a moonless planet but rather the stable seasons we enjoy on earth are condusive to life as we know it and also IMO more important than the tide, much more. If on the other hand you were musing about what a mud puddle would think of the moon's importance for it's continued survival I imagine it would say "Moon? We don't need no friken moon.
  7. Hi Strange I have always understood that the moon stabilizes the earth and limits the amount of precession or wobble thus giving us more stable seasons and that would be pretty important. But while looking for a link for you I found some counter evidence.http://www.astrobio.net/news-exclusive/the-odds-for-life-on-a-moonless-earth/ From the article I don't know but 10 degrees sounds pretty big to me.
  8. Hi I'm Jon from Alabama. Long time lurker (4 years+) and although I do have a lot of questions I find that most of them have already been answered or will be if I wait long enough. There are a few things I did want to say. The first is that this forum is extremely well maintained and I want to thank the mods and members who cause that to happen and also Dave who apparently does the dirty work. I frequent several different MB's but this is the only one I visit every day. For those few members who complain about lack of free speech, bias,etc. I am sorry but you are just wrong although the mods do make mistakes at times they are few and far between. I also want to thank the knowledgeable members who have added to my meager education. You probably do not realize the good that you do. I have no way of knowing how many lurkers I might represent with this post but I think there are many like me that come just to learn. My main interest is astronomy and cosmology but I am seriously math deficient so y'all help a lot. As I am 50 and still work a lot of hours I am probably not going to learn the math anytime soon. Who knows maybe when I retire.
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