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Showing content with the highest reputation on 05/29/21 in all areas

  1. This statement is false on its face. That's why readers are put off and have no idea what you're talking about. Could you give a specific example? Say I have a line segment of length 2 and another of length 3, both with one end at the origin of the x-y plane. Can you show how you get the third side? What additional information is supplied? Please be specific. No need for extraneous discussions of the travails of your long-suffering teacher. Just show an example of two lengths and how you determine the third one. Also, what does pnp stand for? Give a specific, completely worked
    2 points
  2. Hey everyone, I hope the question is not off topic. A few days ago I made a saline solution (45g salt and 180ml of tap water) in a stainless steel pan. This solution was boiled to dissolve the salt and used to add a specific amount of salt to a beer I made, a german style that is traditionally made with salty water. While I was dosing the salt in each bottle I noticed that the solution had turned sligh yellowish, but at first I assumed it was just some salt impurity. However, a few hours after bottling I came back to wash the pan and realized the salt had started to corrode the bottom, an
    1 point
  3. Or they aren’t actually moving. It’s an illusion.
    1 point
  4. Should somebody let the authorities know that this toy company is breaking the laws of physics? https://www.hexbug.com/nano
    1 point
  5. Not hydrogen atoms. You want a conducting solid material, such as a metal plate, because the idea - at least as I recall it - is that with light above a certain frequency a current flows in a circuit, due to the emitted electrons, whereas below that frequency it doesn't. The experimental setup to "catch" the emitted electrons is shown in this diagram from the Wiki page: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Photoelectric_effect#/media/File:Photoelectric_effect_measurement_apparatus_-_microscopic_picture.svg You can certainly ionise hydrogen or other gases with light with energy above the ion
    1 point
  6. That's weird, when I click the link it takes me to the imdb site for the episode titled "The Neutral Zone" The one line description is: "While assigned to investigate missing outposts in the Neutral Zone, the Enterprise revives three cryogenically frozen people found aboard a wayward derelict Earth vessel."
    1 point
  7. There’s nothing unreasonable in asking you to check on the numbers for something that you are questioning. Your response suggests you did not comprehend the post. Wait, iNow says “I bet” about some prediction, and you eviscerate them for not having the actual data, but now you say “I doubt” without supporting data? Hold yourself to at least the standard you ask of others. Hypocrisy isn’t a good look. US stats are available from the CDC https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/vsrr/covid_weekly/index.htm
    1 point
  8. No. To create a current, a photon would have to be absorbed by an electron which then would be ejected from the medium's atoms and accelerated. The ejection of an electron from an atom in a medium requires the addition of energy. Such thing happens in e.g. photoelectric effect: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Photoelectric_effect A photon passing though a transparent medium has to exit it from the opposite side (otherwise the medium is opaque). An opaque medium can: reflect photons, refract photons (in random directions) or absorb photons. (a transparent medium fo
    1 point
  9. And that is precisely why we did not manage to stamp out the disease in the first place and why the chances of stamping it out is diminishing. I wished I could say I was surprised but I really am just disappointed. In addition what has already been mentioned, one can get more details from state/provincial data as well from COVID-Net (USA). Looking at the cumulative values, about 20% of all recorded COVID-19 related hospitalizations in the US were folks below 40 years. Also, being fit is is not confer magic protection. There have been plenty of hospitalizations of folks who had no kn
    1 point
  10. Science and morality are different disciplines - one is what we observe in the universe, the other is what we bring to it. Morality is not so straight-forward that we can afford to discard the millennia of thinking that has shaped our cultures. Instead we should be building upon that base, taking what is useful from our mythologies, and creating new ones in the shape of our aspirations. If they are such idiots why give them credence by engaging with them? Such people have the same mentality that has people believing in a flat earth and lizard people ruling the world. No one bel
    1 point
  11. Pretty sure Krauss in one of the other interview Q+A videos, mentions that the seemingly good side of religion, as per the 10 commandments for example, does not have a monopoly on those qualities and ethics, rather that those qualities and ethics are more endowed with science in fact, as science and the scientific method is based on truth and reality, and how democracy would not be able to function without the basis of scientific pronciples and fact, rather then the myth portrayed in a mythical book written by peasents during the Iron age....the very first answer by Krauss in the second video
    1 point
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