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  3. FreeWill

    The Problem of Omnipotence

    What is is good that it seems to be possible even we can not absolutely execute it yet. It seems to me as an absolutely balanced system from the subatomic structure until the general structure of the universe. Yet we do not understand wherefrom Energy and Matter is originating so obviously it is difficult to recognize the exact functions the system is acting upon. Relativity just needs a fine tuning (apply it within mathematics?) to become absolute reality.
  4. Quantus

    DNA basepair sequence length spectrum of bacteria?

    Thank you. I see its gonna be a lot of work even for the most simple organisms as expected. My plan is to write an artificial neural network, which can process huge amounts of simple inputs (the inputs will be numbers from 0-3 for each base). On the other side I'll use as many characteristics of the specific organism. To specify what each basepair or rather any possible combination sequence means and if it has any impact I need many different DNA sequences of organisms with same and completely different characteristics. The biggest problems which I still need to solve are the different lengths of the DNA (different amounts of input) and a good way of categorizing the output in a proper way
  5. I am not entirely sure what you are looking for, do you want to find the sequences of specific organisms? https://science.sciencemag.org/content/277/5331/1453 shows the length of the E. Coli genome: 4,639,221 basepairs NCBI contains the sequences of many organisms: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/nuccore/U00096 Encode is database containing elements of DNA, which should help you with the characteristics of the DNA https://www.encodeproject.org/ If I may ask, what do you mean by "decoding the DNA"? -Dagl
  6. I am interested in decoding DNA so I'm looking for information about the sequence length of DNA. Or more particular the actual sequenced DNA of hundreds of simple organisms plus their characteristics. Since the world biogenome project started there should be many publications of such information but I couldn't find any. Does anyone know were to get this kind of data? Thanks in advance
  7. Sensei

    Book of Enoch (decryption)

    Do you realize it is quantum physicists forum? You should go here and ask questions like "how to disintegrate atom XXX *?" Then there would be some senseful discussion going.. *) XXX replace by some e.g. isotope of some element.. There is 3134 isotopes ATM.
  8. dominorus

    Book of Enoch (decryption)

    The ancient Book of Enoch tells about two hundred angels (they called themselves Watchers), who descended to Earth. They explained Enoch the calendar, which he recorded, "but not for this generation, but for a remote one which is for to come". What was hidden in the calendar for future generations? I was able to find the answer to this question. Now the millennia-old story begun by Enoch is completed. Find out more in these videos.
  9. Sensei

    My 5 year old loves atoms. What now?

    @Ghideon It is brilliant idea for a game for (and with) a child! +1. Let him or her build the molecule with balls-n-sticks, and search on-line what it is actually and read what it is doing. This is quite an interesting, innovative and not boring way to learn chemistry.
  10. Yesterday
  11. Thank you for this detailed reply. Here are my initial thoughts, more detail to follow as it is late here. The point I am making is that entropy increases when you consider the entropy of the system plus the entropy of the surroundings. System B is (by definition) part of the surroundings to system A at the beginning of your process, since it is not part of system A. System B is also isolated from system A. During the process systems A and B amalgamate to form system C, which is again isolated from the rest of the universe. This is therefore not the system you started with, unless you choose to so adopt it, instead of system A. This approach has the advantage that isolation (of system C = the system) is maintained at all times. But the volume of system C does not change so ln(V2/V1) = 0 and classical thermodynamics is upheld. Alternatively you can start with system A alone as the system. In this case you loose the isolation the moment you remove the barrier between system A and some of its surroundings. If you calculate the number of microstates in the enlarged system from Boltzman's Law then you will find that the increase in W more than compensates for the loss of entropy in system A alone as a result of the mass efflux.
  12. I regard this as a definition issue. I had assumed that, as in many other fields, thermodynamics could have two or more subsystems comprising one system, but all I could find was systems. From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermodynamic_system I'll refer to your diagram and labelling to avoid confusion. The system A (i.e. the contents of chamber A) has a volume of x cubic units. The system B (i.e. the contents of chamber B) has a volume of y-x cubic units. The system C, which is the contents of chamber A plus the contents of chamber B, has a volume of y cubic units. System A contains ideal gas in equilibrium at a temperature [math]T= \frac {2U}{ 3Nk}[/math]. System B is a vacuum. Just before the start of my scenario the barrier between system A and system B is almost instantaneously removed and taken outside both systems with no significant effect (at that instant) on any of the three systems. More plausible scenarios for this action can be devised. Classically, such things can be done with an arbitrarily small effect on the system. Without the barrier, at the start of my scenario, system A, still instantaneously in equilibrium, has entropy [math]\displaystyle S = Nk \Bigg(\ln\bigg(\frac{V_x}{N}\Big(\frac{4 \pi mU}{3Nh^2}\Big)^\frac{3}{2}\bigg)+\frac{5}{2}\Bigg)[/math] System B has entropy [math]0\frac{J}{K}[/math]. As entropy is an extensive property´╗┐, the entropy of System C is the sum of the entropies of system A and system B. Do you agree? Ignoring intermediate steps for now, system C eventually reaches thermal equilibrium. Its entropy is [math]\displaystyle S = Nk \Bigg(\ln\bigg(\frac{V_y}{N}\Big(\frac{4 \pi mU}{3Nh^2}\Big)^\frac{3}{2}\bigg)+\frac{5}{2}\Bigg)[/math] The change in entropy is [math]\Delta S = nK \ln\big(\frac {y}{x}\big) [/math] Its temperature is the same as system A's original temperature i.e. [math]T= \frac {2U}{ 3Nk}[/math], since neither U nor N has changed. No net work has been done. Intermediate steps: and You seem to be saying that if e.g. the left wall of the chamber was rigid, adiabatic and movable, entropy increase would happen since compressing the gas from volume y back down to volume x would be possible i.e. reversing the process; if the left wall is not movable the expansion process is IMO unchanged but entropy cannot increase since the process is irreversible.... From your source http://www.splung.com/content/sid/6/page/secondlaw i.e. since my example is neither perfectly efficient at producing work nor a closed thermodynamic cycle entropy increases. IMO some of the above quotes are inconsistent with this: I'm not sure if all these are your views or partly representation of Timo's views. I'm avoiding quoting Timo since we seem to agree with him but draw different conclusions. The above quote is arguably inconsistent with I took that a bit casually; of course the gas cooling was not work. All work done ends up becoming heat as the system approaches equilibrium. In short, the system evolution is not in practice describable with any accuracy but the entropy increases monotonically from the initial state to the final equilibrium state. More I could say but not now...
  13. studiot

    why/how a particle can go into superposition

    Yes but a scale of mass is not very complex. There are other far more complicated objects around.
  14. hipster doofus

    why/how a particle can go into superposition

    well, amount of mass could equal complexity.
  15. studiot

    why/how a particle can go into superposition

    Such dramatics are not requested. Yes I realised that I missed out making it clear I was referring to your idea so I added those words as an edit. I'm sorry if that threw you. The idea I'm referring to is the idea that Yes I think they, like many other 'object' I have tried to talk to you about do not inhabit spacetime. So I think you are right there. But you also say because of their size and I disagree with this part. I think they belong in another framework because of their complexity. They do indeed have a common point of intersection between their world and spacetime. But the two 'worlds' only touch at one common point. That is how they interact with each other.
  16. hipster doofus

    why/how a particle can go into superposition

    Set whatever equations you got to say unmeasured QM objects are devoid of spacetime.
  17. Ghideon

    why/how a particle can go into superposition

    It does not need to be a new theory, did someone claim that? But the following suggested that some major answers (and hence progress of existing theories) was intended:
  18. hipster doofus

    why/how a particle can go into superposition

    I'm either drunk or you edited your post ..doesn't matter. Do you want me to beg?
  19. studiot

    why/how a particle can go into superposition

    I don't understand what you mean.
  20. hipster doofus

    why/how a particle can go into superposition

    The bigger question is why you didn't declare your discovery already.
  21. studiot

    why/how a particle can go into superposition

    And yet you repeated your idea at the beginning of this thread. Why do you think it was wrong? Wouldn't it be better to ask what idea of yours I thought, and think might be (nearly) right?
  22. hipster doofus

    why/how a particle can go into superposition

    You told me to write an equation for an idea that turned out to be wrong. Not sure how sucking at math was being rude to you.
  23. studiot

    why/how a particle can go into superposition

    You have had a good idea. Good because most people don't notice this. However your idea is not quite right and the consequences that you attribute to it do not flow from it. Your consequences are thus wrong. The last time I tried to help you understand (and develop) this idea of yours you were quite rude, and then stopped talking to me.
  24. Enthalpy

    String Instruments

    I suggested to replace spruce or sycamore with yew (Taxus baccata), here on February 10, 2019 12:33 AM, to increase the flexibility of the midrib of traditional harps while keeping the resistance. This applies to much of the harp's soundboard too. Wherever the strings' tension makes the soundboard too stiff, yew will be more flexible and louder. It would apply to any instrument whose strings tension limits the soundboard. How does yew sound in a harp? This must be experimented. Yew was sought after for mandolins, not only for long bows. The definitive way to build loud harps should be my soundboards parallel to the strings, which don't suffer the same limitations hence shouldn't benefit from yew. Marc Schaefer, aka Enthalpy
  25. hipster doofus

    why/how a particle can go into superposition

    we are now talking, tell me why I am both right and wrong
  26. beecee

    'Artemis' 2024 Moon mission:

    Thanks for that update et pet...interesting to say the least. What we can be reasonably certain of though, is that in time, NASA [or someone else] will return to the Moon, and I see that probably as a prelude to eventual boots on Mars. I'm not really interested in the question/s "should we do these things?", the reality is that we will do these things in the course of time.
  27. studiot

    why/how a particle can go into superposition

    Perhaps if you took other people more seriously you might make faster progress.
  28. What a great Initiative.
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