Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Riemann hypothesis


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 Sriman Dutta

Sriman Dutta

    Molecule

  • Senior Members
  • 419 posts
  • LocationKolkata, India

Posted 18 October 2016 - 02:55 PM

Hi,

I want to know why is the Riemann hypothesis still unsolved? I really want to know the reasons due to which it is still unsolved.

:-)


  • 0
We are what we repeatedly do.
Excellence is then not an act but a habit.
-Aristotle

#2 mathematic

mathematic

    Molecule

  • Senior Members
  • 720 posts

Posted 18 October 2016 - 09:46 PM

It is a difficult problem.  What are you thinking by asking "why"?


  • 0

#3 wtf

wtf

    Baryon

  • Senior Members
  • 114 posts

Posted 19 October 2016 - 12:13 AM

It is a difficult problem.  What are you thinking by asking "why"?


How do we know it's difficult? Because so many people have been unable to solve it!

OP has a good question. What is it, exactly, that makes RH a difficult problem? Why have FLT and the Poincaré conjecture been solved, but not RH?

That's way above my pay grade. But at heart it's a very good question IMO.

Edited by wtf, 19 October 2016 - 12:13 AM.

  • 0

#4 StringJunky

StringJunky

    Genius

  • Senior Members
  • 5,502 posts
  • LocationUK

Posted 19 October 2016 - 01:57 AM

Nobody can find a technique that can predict what the next prime will be, to infinity without going through the list and working it out.  They are trying to find a bespoke formula that can predict them; a shortcut. The pattern of occurrence of primes appears to be random but I think they think otherwise and, I think, that's one of the reasons why it is so difficult. This article by Marcus Du Sautoy gives an easy, potted read to the problem and it's history..

 

https://plus.maths.o...-number-lottery


Edited by StringJunky, 19 October 2016 - 01:59 AM.

  • 0

 Education, like life, is a journey not a destination


#5 Sriman Dutta

Sriman Dutta

    Molecule

  • Senior Members
  • 419 posts
  • LocationKolkata, India

Posted 19 October 2016 - 04:09 PM

So now I get that.

Thanks for all your help.

:-)


  • 0
We are what we repeatedly do.
Excellence is then not an act but a habit.
-Aristotle

#6 renerpho

renerpho

    Quark

  • Members
  • 20 posts
  • LocationGermany

Posted 20 November 2016 - 11:06 PM

Nobody can find a technique that can predict what the next prime will be, to infinity without going through the list and working it out.  They are trying to find a bespoke formula that can predict them; a shortcut. The pattern of occurrence of primes appears to be random but I think they think otherwise and, I think, that's one of the reasons why it is so difficult. This article by Marcus Du Sautoy gives an easy, potted read to the problem and it's history..

 

https://plus.maths.o...-number-lottery

 

Actually we think that the primes behave essentially like a pseudo-random number sequence (with a few known differences that are already well-understood). The Riemann hypothesis would confirm some that (at least in parts). It would allow to make a lot of predictions about the behaviour of primes (because many methods used to study random number sequences could be used to tackle prime numbers).

It's a common misconception that the Riemann hypothesis would result in hidden patterns in the prime numbers. The opposite is true: The reason why there are so many unproven conjectures about primes is that we don't know if there are any fancy, hidden patterns.


Edited by renerpho, 20 November 2016 - 11:07 PM.

  • 1

#7 StringJunky

StringJunky

    Genius

  • Senior Members
  • 5,502 posts
  • LocationUK

Posted 21 November 2016 - 03:34 PM

Actually we think that the primes behave essentially like a pseudo-random number sequence (with a few known differences that are already well-understood). The Riemann hypothesis would confirm some that (at least in parts). It would allow to make a lot of predictions about the behaviour of primes (because many methods used to study random number sequences could be used to tackle prime numbers).
It's a common misconception that the Riemann hypothesis would result in hidden patterns in the prime numbers. The opposite is true: The reason why there are so many unproven conjectures about primes is that we don't know if there are any fancy, hidden patterns.


Right. Thanks for the clarification.
  • 1

 Education, like life, is a journey not a destination





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users