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Funny Invasive Species Youtube Video


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#1 thatbiologyg

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Posted 9 August 2007 - 01:23 PM

I thought this was quite funny:

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It would probably be more humorous if I weren't married to a restoration ecologist - hits a little to close to home...:rolleyes: I can't even have a simple walk in the park without him threatening the trees (Siberian Elm and Callery Pear) with death and destruction :doh:
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#2 Glider

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Posted 10 August 2007 - 08:23 AM

I liked it :-) It hits close to home here too though. I have Japanese knotweed growing in my garden and it's a constant battle trying to kill it. It's unbelievably tough! I also have a problem with American Grey squirrels. They dig up my trees in the autumn and and chew on their bark in the winter, damn them!

On the other hand, I have many Japanese maple, Trident Maple, Japanese elm, Chinese elm, Pomigranate, Japanese Black Pine, Jack pine, Mugo pine and Satsuki and Kurume azaleas, none of which are UK natives and many of which can be found growing 'wild' here.

I think the difference between 'foreign invader' and 'welcome guest' is entirely based on how they behave once they're here (or there). Siberian Elm and Callery Pear have both turned out to be invasive.
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#3 thatbiologyg

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Posted 10 August 2007 - 03:01 PM

I liked it :-) It hits close to home here too though. I have Japanese knotweed growing in my garden and it's a constant battle trying to kill it. It's unbelievably tough! I also have a problem with American Grey squirrels. They dig up my trees in the autumn and and chew on their bark in the winter, damn them!


Oh, Japanese Knotweed is the WORST! It can even grow through concrete. It will grow into your basement if you aren't careful :eek: ([url][/url])

You can eat it though, apparently it tastes like rhubarb and can be prepared in much the same way. Just pick the young shoots and cut them up, add sugar and you've got a great pie filling.

My husband kills them by cutting the shoots to about three inches from the ground and filling the cavity in the stem with round-up. I believe you have to do this several times a year for a few years before the clone will completely die off.

You're definitely right about not all non-natives being a problem, its only a small percentage that go crazy and become an issue. Even native species adapted for areas of disturbance can hinder restoration efforts. Here poplar, sassafras, aspen, horsetail and many others are commonly removed from preserves. The trees are a problem because they move into the prairies which don't see fire as they historically would have.

At any rate, good luck with your knotweed problem, you'll need it!
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That Biology Girl ~00~

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#4 Glider

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Posted 11 August 2007 - 06:08 AM

At any rate, good luck with your knotweed problem, you'll need it!

If only I could train the damned squirrels to eat the stuff!
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"The strongest knowledge (that of the total unfreedom of the human will) is nonetheless the poorest in success, for it always has the strongest opponent: Human vanity" (Nietzsche, 1879).

#5 HallsofIvy

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Posted 13 August 2007 - 05:26 PM

I've always though HUMANS were the really invasive species. I think that clip proves it!
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