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HCL+KNO3 to make HNO3?

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A) people eat and drink from them, so it`s not a good idea.

B) with the exception of the coffee carafe they`re not designed for local heating.

C) because they hold a large amount of liquids, Any problems that occur will be significantly harder to deal with.

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anywho, i got my flask and filled up it up with 46% h2so4 (battery acid) up to 250ml, its been under gas fire heat (bubbling also) for about 1 hour now, but it havent reduced in ammount, or have i noticed "white fumes"

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hmm... I don't think that'll work considering that both of the reactants are ionic and completely soluble in water. Basically, if you mix the two, you'll just have a solution of H+, Cl-, K+, and NO3- ions floating around so to speak. And I don't think that there's a way to separate both the Cl- AND K+ ions from the solution either. I suppose you could remove the Cl- by adding AgNO3 which would form a solid AgCl which could then be filtered, but I don't think there's an effective way of removing potassium ions.

 

As a matter of facts, I actually pulled of this exact reaction just the other day. I wanted to make KCl by mixing 30% w/w hydrochloric acid, with solid KNO3. This resulted in an endothermic reaction, producing the ions you also mention in the above postulate (K⁺, Cl⁻, NO3⁻ and H3O⁺).

However, it is possible to seperate the KCl by recrystallization. I reacted 100mL 30% hydrochloric acid with 83g of powdered potassium nitrate, yielding about 45g of crude KCl after crystallization.

 

I don't know though, what the complete reaction should look like! Under the reaction I found that nitrogen gas was produced as well, but what actually remains in the mother liquid, I don't know...:| Maybe, it is a weak solution of "aqua regia"?

 

regards

 

The following reaction occurs, when nitric acid and hydrochloric acid are mixed. This also explains, why aqua regia needs a 1 : 3 molar ratio of HNO3 and HCl.

 

 

HNO3 + 3HCl --> ONCl + Cl2 + 2H2O

 

 

The precise reaction is much more complex, the equation above only is a net equation.

 

 

If you heat a mix of HNO3 and HCl (or KNO3 and HCl), then you'll see that the liquid becomes yellow, or even orange. That yellow/orange color is the color of NOCl. At high concentrations of HCl this is stable. At lower concentrations of HCl it hydrolyses:

 

 

ONCl + H2O <--> HNO2 + HCl

 

Hey! Thanks for this reply dude.. really helped me out a lot! I got to a pale yellow liquid after adding aqeous HCl to KNO3.. I wanted to produce KCl, which I also did.. I used slow heating during the crystallizationprocess.. When combining hydrochloric acid with potassium nitrate, an endothermic reaction occurs, and N2 is released.. as long as no heating is applied, I think you would be in the 'safe zone' here:)

 

Regards

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Good day. Does anybody know how to clean the KCl after it was cristalized out of the solution? My KCl is pale yellow, since it have HCl and HNO3 contamination a byproduct of mixing HCl and KNO3 and since I am going to use in the further reaction I want to make as clean as possible(or at least without HCl and HNO3).

 

Thank you.

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