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akcapr

sharpie solvent

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akcapr    10

does anyone kno what the solvent in sharpies is? ive heard its nitroparaffin, but that didnt really make sense

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Bluenoise    10

Well you should have googled it since the first result for sharpie solvent links you to a msds on the sharpie page that sates that they contain two solvents.

Nitroparaffin and naphtha.

 

Seems that the super sharpie permenant markers contain Ethylene Glycol Monobutyl Ether instead.

I'd guess that they might use even more types of solvents in different types of markers they produce.

 

Here's a link to MSDS's for all their products.

http://www.sharpie.com/sanford/consumer/sharpie/whatsinside/msds.jhtml

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Squintz    13

When I read the title of this thread I thought for some reason that you wanted to dissolve permanent marker. So since I know the answer to that question which isnt the question you were asking I figured I would post it here anyways.

 

If you have marker that you want to remove from any surface use 50% Toluene and 50% Isopropanol. The mixture is commonly known as Rosin Solvent which is used to remove solder flux residue from electronic circuits.

 

Micro Measurments M-Line sells the stuff but you could probably get it from radio shack also.

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jdurg    31

It means that the Hydroxyl (-OH) group is at the end of the butane chain and not on a middle carbon. (So the structure would be CH3-CH2-CH2-CH2-OH).

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Mendelejev    12

Indeed, and when it's on the second C of the chain, instead of the first, we call it iso-...

 

For example CH3-CH2OH-CH2-CH2-CH3 is iso-pentanol (or 2-pentanol) (or 2-hydroxo-pentane, but I don't think it's what the IUPAC wants)

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jdurg    31

Actually, the iso terminology is limited to when the functional group is on the middle carbon in the chain. So 2-pentanol would not be isopentanol. 3-pentanol, however, would be as by putting the -OH on the third carbon you have it right smack dab in the middle. (For butanol, there is no isobutanol. You either have n-butanol, or 2-butanol).

 

Edit: Oops, I made a bit of an error there. Isobutanol does exist, but not as a straight chain alcohol. Isobutanol is simply n-propanol with a methyl group attached to the 2nd carbon of n-propanol. So technically, it could be called isomethyl-n-propanol.

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akcapr    10

since carbon componds liek benzene, etc., form carbon rings, how do u know wich carbon is considered the first?

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akcapr    10

well how about one that is a ring but not symetrical, how do u know which carbon is which?

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H2SO4    10
When I read the title of this thread I thought for some reason that you wanted to dissolve permanent marker. So since I know the answer to that question which isnt the question you were asking I figured I would post it here anyways.

 

If you have marker that you want to remove from any surface use 50% Toluene and 50% Isopropanol. The mixture is commonly known as Rosin Solvent which is used to remove solder flux residue from electronic circuits.

 

Micro Measurments M-Line sells the stuff but you could probably get it from radio shack also.

 

 

 

Im sure the ULTIMATE sharpie remover is 99% isopropyl alcohol. Instant.

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Mendelejev    12
Actually' date=' the iso terminology is limited to when the functional group is on the middle carbon in the chain. So 2-pentanol would not be isopentanol. 3-pentanol, however, would be as by putting the -OH on the third carbon you have it right smack dab in the middle. (For butanol, there is no isobutanol. You either have n-butanol, or 2-butanol).

 

Edit: Oops, I made a bit of an error there. Isobutanol does exist, but not as a straight chain alcohol. Isobutanol is simply n-propanol with a methyl group attached to the 2nd carbon of n-propanol. So technically, it could be called isomethyl-n-propanol.[/quote']

 

Mmmm, don't think I really understand that.

 

http://chipo.chem.uic.edu/web1/ocol/SB/2-1.htm

 

Aren't they telling what I was telling. Or not ? I've never been so go good in nomenclature, but I would like to understand it at least.

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