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hoola

superconductivity question

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is there any known link of superconductivity to virtual particle behavior? Would the exclusion of virtual particles tend to reduce the "noise" in the system if that were possible? If not, would it be possible to exclude the particles from a given region under any condition ?

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thanks bender, the casimir experiment does reduce the appearances of some wavelenghts, but is there a theoretical prohibition against removing them completely ? If they are separated at BH horizons, what happens in the interior?

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thanks bender, the casimir experiment does reduce the appearances of some wavelenghts, but is there a theoretical prohibition against removing them completely ? If they are separated at BH horizons, what happens in the interior?

Hawking radiation stems from the addition of energy making the virtual particles real, so that's not an example of excluding them.

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yes, hawking at the horizon is not an example, but I am referring to the interior of the hole. What happens inside the horizon to a pair, should they show up, or are they excluded?

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yes, hawking at the horizon is not an example, but I am referring to the interior of the hole. What happens inside the horizon to a pair, should they show up, or are they excluded?

 

 

We would probably need a theory of quantum gravity to answer that, but as far as I know, current theory says that virtual particle pairs will behave the same inside the event horizon as outside.

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Thanks strange.....the idea of the interior of a black hole having no matter seems problematic. So, the gravity field does not require a carrier or some sub-structure to manifest the field? A gravitational "monopole" with no counterpart? . The earth has a 1G field strength at the surface. I would presume that gravity drops off as you near the center with a matching pressure increase. Would the pressure at a BH interior cause infalling matter and energy to be crushed to strings, trading QM derived gravitational pressure maximized at the horizon, for classical compression as you approach the center? Casimir demonstrates a reduction of particle expression in some circumstances. It would seem the super density of the interior would exclude pair formation in a sort of casimir-exclusion principle.

Edited by hoola

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Thanks strange.....the idea of the interior of a black hole having no matter seems problematic. So, the gravity field does not require a carrier or some sub-structure to manifest the field?

 

 

Not until we have a theory of quantum gravity (in which case it should be the [hypothetical] graviton).

 

 

 

The earth has a 1G field strength at the surface. I would presume that gravity drops off as you near the center with a matching pressure increase.

 

Correct (Newton's Shell theorem).

 

 

 

Would the pressure at a BH interior cause infalling matter and energy to be crushed to strings, trading QM derived gravitational pressure maximized at the horizon, for classical compression as you approach the center? Casimir demonstrates a reduction of particle expression in some circumstances. It would seem the super density of the interior would exclude pair formation in a sort of casimir-exclusion principle.

 

Again, we won't know until we have a theory of quantum gravity!

 

String theory has a model called the fuzzball: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fuzzball_(string_theory)

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